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I have an exercise that asks me to complement the code , so that his execution obtained as a result equivalent to $ date> out.txt

#include <stdio.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#define NEWFILE (O_WRONLY | O_CREAT)
#define MODE644 (S_IRUSR | S_IWUSR | S_IRGRP | S_IROTH)

int main() {
    int fd;
    if (fork() == 0) {
        //// Code Here for add/// Result

        fd=open("out.txt",NEWFILE,MODE644);
        dup2(fd,1);
        close(fd);

        execlp("date",NULL);
        exit(0);
     }
     wait(NULL);
 }

I can not understand the three lines that have been added:

 fd=open("out.txt",NEWFILE,MODE644);
 dup2(fd,1);
 close(fd);
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The tricky bit is dup2.

int dup2(int fildes, int fildes2);

It closes filedes2 and makes it a clone of filedes. Which means, from now on when you refer to filedes2 it's as if you referred to filedes. Back to your code, you should know that STDOUT_FILENO is 1.

So your code means:

  • Open a file (descriptor filedes)
  • Close STDOUT_FILENO and make it refer to filedes
share|improve this answer

open opens the file and returns a file descriptor. dup2(fildes, fildes2) "shall cause the file descriptor fildes2 to refer to the same open file description as the file descriptor fildes", i.e. it closes standard output (if it's open) and makes stdout a copy of your new file descriptor. close then closes fd as it's no longer needed, since stdout is now the file you just opened.

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