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I'm using this code to validate string.

$countrecipient ='0123456789';

preg_match('/^[0]{1}[1]{1}[0-9]{1}[0-9]{7}?$/', $countrecipient)

How if I want to validate if the number contain "+" sign in front or not?

Such as :

$countrecipient ='+0123456789';

and still need to validate the rest of the string.

I tried this:

 if(preg_match('/^[+]{1}[6]{1}[0]{1}[1]{1}[0-9]{1}[0-9]{7}?$/', $countrecipient))
 {
   echo "Ok";
 }
 else
 {
   echo "Error";
 }

It works in my pc but I'm not sure why my customer is complaining it shows him error.

Thank you.

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1  
So... you haven't been able to reproduce the error? –  Juhana Feb 24 '12 at 10:59

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For an optional plus in front you could use:

preg_match('/^\+?[0]{1}[1]{1}[0-9]{1}[0-9]{7}?$/', $countrecipient);

Notice how I have escaped the + with a backslash? This is because it is a regex keyword which means 1 instance or more.

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Sorry for my late response and thanks for your answer . It works,thanks again. –  Irene Ling Mar 3 '12 at 15:34
$countrecipient ='0123456789';
preg_match('/^[0]{1}[1]{1}[0-9]{1}[0-9]{7}?$/', $countrecipient) 

You're making things unnecessarily complicated. "[0]{1}[1]{1}[0-9]{1}" reduces to simply "01[0-9]".

To have an optional + on the front, your basic idea of using [+] should work. Let's see...

$countrecipient ='+0123456789';
if(preg_match('/^[+]{1}[6]{1}[0]{1}[1]{1}[0-9]{1}[0-9]{7}?$/', $countrecipient))

...again this can be simplified, but it simplies to /^[+]601[0-9][0-9]{7}?$/. Where did the 6 after the + come from? Does this account for your problem?

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I'm so sorry for my late response and thanks for your reply.Yes I just noticed that I made something unnecessarily...Thanks again. –  Irene Ling Mar 3 '12 at 15:33

Plus has a special meaning in PCRE, it's called quantifier and has meaning of {1,}.

You may either put in into character group specification like this [+] which would literally mean one of following characters: array( '+') or escape it with \ so you'll get: \+.

Also adding {1} is implicit and you don't have to add it after one character. If you were doing this matching foo would look like: f{1}o{1}o{1}, ehm f{1}o{2} instead of foo :)

If you want to match both 0123456789 and +012345678 you should use {0,1} which has "shortcut" ?. Than your pattern would look like: /\+?/. I guess your desired regexp is:

/^\+?0?1?[0-9]([0-9]{7})?$/
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Sorry for my late response and Thanks for your answer,will learn it,thanks again. –  Irene Ling Mar 3 '12 at 15:35

The simplified form of your regex is

/\+?01[0-9]{8}/

However I recommend you use intval, is_int, ctype_digit to accomplish this.

if(intval($str)<=100000000){
    // found it.
}
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Sorry for my late response and thanks for your advises. Will take a look to the function. –  Irene Ling Mar 3 '12 at 15:34

Based on regexp you put in the section you tried: "...preg_match('/^[+]{1}[6]{1}[0]{1}[1]{1}[0-9]{1}[0-9]{7}?$/'..."

If you would validate the string AND check if there is a '+' or not, you could use something like this:

if(preg_match('/(\+)?6011[0-9][0-9]{7}?$/', $countrecipient, $matches)) 
{
   if ($matches[1] == '+') {

      echo "Ok WITH PLUS";
   } else {
      echo "Ok without PLUS"; 
   }
}
else
{
   echo "Error";
}
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry for late response and thanks for your answer. –  Irene Ling Mar 3 '12 at 15:35

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