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Possible Duplicate:
What does map(&:name) mean in Ruby?

I came across a code snippet which had the following

a.each_slice(2).map(&:reverse)

I do not know the functionality of &: operator. How does that work?

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marked as duplicate by tokland, Alex Kliuchnikau, Mark Thomas, Jörg W Mittag, Joe Feb 24 '12 at 21:13

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

up vote 40 down vote accepted

There isn't a &: operator in Ruby. What you are seeing is the & operator applied to a :symbol.

In a method argument list, the & operator takes its operand, converts it to a Proc object if it isn't already (by calling to_proc on it) and passes it to the method as if a block had been used.

my_proc = Proc.new { puts "foo" }

my_method_call(&my_proc) # is identical to:
my_method_call { puts "foo" }

So the question now becomes "What does Symbol#to_proc do?", and that's easy to see in the Rails documentation:

Turns the symbol into a simple proc, which is especially useful for enumerations. Examples:

# The same as people.collect { |p| p.name }
people.collect(&:name)

# The same as people.select { |p| p.manager? }.collect { |p| p.salary }
people.select(&:manager?).collect(&:salary)
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3  
You are implying it, but it would be better to tell it explicitly: this is a modification that Rails does, and it's not built-in in Ruby itself. – kikito Feb 24 '12 at 11:30
4  
    
You are right - I've just tried it in plain irb (1.8.7), it's in Ruby itself. This one is not provided by Rails. Thanks for correcting my error! – kikito Feb 24 '12 at 11:45
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@kikito: actually it was first implemented in Rails, but everyone loved it so it made its way into the core. – tokland Feb 24 '12 at 12:05
    
Please don't answer duplicate questions. Just vote to close. This question was already asked and answered 17(!!!) times, there really is nothing gained by spreading out the knowledge even more. – Jörg W Mittag Feb 24 '12 at 15:30

By prepending & to a symbol you are creating a lambda function that will call method with a name of that symbol on the object you pass into this function. Taking that into account:

ar.map(&:reverse)

is roughly equivalent to:

ar.map { |element| element.reverse }
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Please don't answer duplicate questions. Just vote to close. This question was already asked and answered 17(!!!) times, there really is nothing gained by spreading out the knowledge even more. – Jörg W Mittag Feb 24 '12 at 15:30
2  
I saw a question and I answered it. It was marked as duplicate only after that. – KL-7 Feb 24 '12 at 16:20

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