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Pretty simple really.

Beginner to C# and struggling to understand the reasoning behind the syntax for assigning new instances to variables.

Probably one of those things that you don't necessarily need to understand but would provide insight into how the code executes. Question as follows:

If you have a piece of code defining a variable mm, as below:

using System;

class MyMethod
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        string myChoice;

        MyMethod mm = new MyMethod();

Why do you need the first 'MyMethod' before the 'mm'

In other words, why can't you just put

mm = new MyMethod();

instead of

MyMethod mm = new MyMethod();

As far as i am aware (and this may be totally wrong), by putting ' = New MyMethod();' you are defining a new instance of the MyMethod class and assigning it to 'mm'. The 'mm' object already exists in the 'MyMethod' class, so why the additional 'MyMethod' before 'mm'. It seems superfluous to me so want to understand from a code execution point of view what is going on.

Thanks in advance for your help/advice

share|improve this question

You can use var mm = new MyMethod();
The compiler will then automatically infer the type of the variable.

BTW: MyMethod is a pretty bad name for a class.


The following part in your question is not correct:

The 'mm' object already exists in the 'MyMethod' class

That's not the case. mm doesn't exist in that class.

share|improve this answer

There's nothing in the code provided to suggest that mm exists in the MyMethod class. It's a variable that exists only within that method, so you need to specify its type when you initialise it.

share|improve this answer

It's an old standard, because you might want to do something like this

IContact contact = new Person();

But you can have the compiler infer the type by writing "var" instead. I use this when the type is obvious from reading the same line (e.g. above if you wanted the type to be "Person" and not "IContact"), but when assigning something to the result of a method call I am explicit about the type.

share|improve this answer

The 'mm' object already exists in the 'MyMethod' class

No, it does not.

Well, he objec. but not the variable.

MyMethod mm =

declatrres a VARIABLE named mm of type MyMethod.

You can also write it as

var mm

and let the compiler sort out the type.

But at the end, you need to celare the variable that the new object gets assigned to.

It is like that becasue .NET deamnds variables to be decalerd, so that name typing mistakes - using "mn" later will result in a not know n exception, nto in a null pointer because the variable is implicitly created by being used.

share|improve this answer

The syntax of writing your code like:

MyMethod mm = new MyMethod();

is actually only a short form of writing

MyMethod mm;
mm = new MyMethod();

Where in the first line you specify what type of variable you want to use (declaration) and tell the runtime that it will need to allocate memory for it, and in the second line you assign an actual value to it (definition).

[Edit]

It becomes obvious in the first line that you will need to specify the type of the variable, else you would shrink the line to only defining the name name of the variable and the the compiler would not know what it is:

mm;

[/Edit]

Like the others already posted here, splitting this into 2 comes in handy if you need the same variable within nested scopes. In the code example you gave in the opening post, of course this would not be needed as you define the variable within the same scope where it is needed.

[Edit 2]

Think of defining a variable MyMethod mm = new MyMethod(); as a variable like any other. The compiler does not care if you do this in class MyMethod or in any other class.

If you code looked like this, it would be more obvious that there is no connection between the different types OtherClass and MyMethod.

using System;

class OtherClass
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        string myChoice;

        MyMethod mm = new MyMethod();
    }
}

Using a variable that has the same type as the surrounding class - like you did in your own example - is perfectly legal to do, but is no "self reference" in a way that would allow you to omit the type. It is just a simple variable within the scope of the Main method that has coincidently the same type.

share|improve this answer
    
I think the issue i'm struggling to get my head round is the apparent self-reference of 'MyMethod' In my primitive coding mind im seeing a variable of type mm, which is a new instance of MyMethod, which is itself the type that mm is defined as. The more i try and get my head round it the more i feel like im missing something fundamental. Maybe time to go back to the drawing board! – user1230617 Feb 24 '12 at 12:07
    
@user1230617: This no self reference in the usual meaning. Think of mmas avariable like any other. You are just using a variable of type MyMethod. Whether you do so in the class MyMethod or in any arbitrary other class does not matter. What if you moved the Main method into another class, say YouMethod. Would you still feel that the form MyMethod mm = new would doubled? – Jens H Feb 24 '12 at 12:16

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