Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a problem with Matplotlib 1.0.1

I create a figure, and the I use an onclick event to do stuff when I click into the figure. One thing is, that it has to create a new figure with new data in it. This perfectly works in Matplotlib 0.99.3, where I developed the script, but now a collegue tried it on his machine, which has matplotlib 1.0.1 (and python 2.6 instead of 2.7), and the figure is not shown.

However, I think the figure is created, but not shown, because if I close the first figure, the script is not ended, it is still running.

Here is a simple example code:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.add_subplot(111)

a = [1,2,3]
b = [4,2,9]

line = ax.plot(a,b)

def onclick(event):
    print "clicked"
    a = [7,8,9]
    b = [1,9,20]
    fig2 = plt.figure()
    ax_single = fig2.add_subplot(111)
    line2 = ax_single.plot(a,b)

cid = fig.canvas.mpl_connect('button_press_event',onclick)
plt.show()

Is this a (known) bug in matplotlib 1.0.1? Is there any way around it?

Thx.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Adding a simple fig2.show() did the trick to me. Read the How-to to get more information!

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.add_subplot(111)

a = [1,2,3]
b = [4,2,9]

line = ax.plot(a,b)

def onclick(event):
    print "clicked"
    a = [7,8,9]
    b = [1,9,20]
    fig2 = plt.figure()
    ax_single = fig2.add_subplot(111)
    line2 = ax_single.plot(a,b)
    fig2.show()

cid = fig.canvas.mpl_connect('button_press_event',onclick)
plt.show()

The was indeed a change in 1.0.0 in the way matplotlib handles figures after the mainloop has been started.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that did it! –  Pythoneer Feb 24 '12 at 12:48
    
+1: This is essentially the (new) documented behavior of pyplot.show(): it displays figures that were updated/created since the last show(). Reference: matplotlib.sourceforge.net/users/…. –  EOL Feb 24 '12 at 13:20

You can put Pyplot in interactive mode at the beginning:

plt.ion()

and then end your program with something like

raw_input('Press enter when done...')

(instead of show()).

The semantics of show() and of the interactive mode were updated with Matplotlib 1.0. You can get more information on this on StackOverflow: Exact semantics of Matplotlib's "interactive mode" (ion(), ioff())?. I understand that using the interactive mode (ion) is generally more convenient. Another important point is that in interactive mode, only pyplot.* functions automatically draw/redraw plots (and not <object>.*() methods).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.