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Here is the code:

public class MyClass implements Inreface1, Inreface2 {
    public MyClass() {
        System.out.println("name is :: " + name);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new MyClass();
    }
}
//Interface1
public interface Inreface1 {
    public String name="Name";
}
 //Interface2
public interface Inreface2 {
    public String name="Name";
}

Here is the error it causes:

The field name is ambiguous

What is the problem? What is ambiguous?

share|improve this question
3  
"i try hard but cant find wor d ambiguous" - I don't believe you. – user658042 Feb 24 '12 at 12:18
    
@alextsc - you're mean ;) – pap Feb 24 '12 at 12:32
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your class is implementing two interfaces, and on both of them, the variable name is defined. Thus, when you call name in your class, Java is not able to determine if the variable refers to Interface1.name or Interface.name.

That's the problem in your code...

share|improve this answer
    
thnx for answer but what is ambiguous ? – Samir Mangroliya Feb 24 '12 at 12:15
2  
thefreedictionary.com/ambiguous – nhaarman Feb 24 '12 at 12:16
3  
and the way to fix it is to prefix it with the class name: "name is "+Inreface1.name – Thilo Feb 24 '12 at 12:16
    
The variable called name, which is defined in your two interfaces. Change it to foo, and the error message will be The field foo is ambiguous – romaintaz Feb 24 '12 at 12:17

Class MyClass implements two interfaces, which both have a name variable. In the constructor of MyClass, Java doesn't know which name to pick - the one from Inreface1 or the one from Inreface2. You could tell it explicitly:

public MyClass() {
    System.out.println("name is :: " + Inreface1.name);
}
share|improve this answer

Look at your code:

System.out.println("name is :: " + name);

Which "name" should the compiler use? I's ambiguous, because could be Inreface1.name or Inreface2.name. If you clear the ambiguity by specifying one "name" the error should disappear. For instance:

System.out.println("name is :: " + Inreface1.name);
share|improve this answer

what is ambiguous ?

If two fields with the same name are inherited by an interface because, for example, two of its direct superinterfaces declare fields with that name, then a single ambiguous member results. Any use of this ambiguous member will result in a compile-time error. Thus in the example:

   interface BaseColors {
        int RED = 1, GREEN = 2, BLUE = 4;
    }
    interface RainbowColors extends BaseColors {
        int YELLOW = 3, ORANGE = 5, INDIGO = 6, VIOLET = 7;
    }
    interface PrintColors extends BaseColors {
        int YELLOW = 8, CYAN = 16, MAGENTA = 32;
    }
    interface LotsOfColors extends RainbowColors, PrintColors {
        int FUCHSIA = 17, VERMILION = 43, CHARTREUSE = RED+90;
    }

the interface LotsOfColors inherits two fields named YELLOW. This is all right as long as the interface does not contain any reference by simple name to the field YELLOW. (Such a reference could occur within a variable initializer for a field.)

Even if interface PrintColors were to give the value 3 to YELLOW rather than the value 8, a reference to field YELLOW within interface LotsOfColors would still be considered ambiguous.

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Another point is that instance variables are not allowed in interfaces. Your public string turns into a constant : public static String name; - which you get two times. More than one constant with the same name/type is definitely ambiguous.

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It looks like you're referring to the same variable.

I think the compiler does not know which value you are trying to pass. Have you tried changing the field variable?

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