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I have been searching a source code for generating combination using c++. I found some advanced codes for this but that is good for only specific number predefined data. Can anyone give me some hints, or perhaps, some idea to generate combination. As an example, suppose the set S = { 1, 2, 3, ...., n} and we pick r= 2 out of it. The input would be n and r.In this case, the program will generate arrays of length two, like 5 2 outputs 1 2, 1 3, etc.. I had difficulty in constructing the algorithm. It took me a month thinking about this.

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I don't really understand what you want. Given the set S and input 2 do you want all the combinations of 2 and each item of S in an array of array length 2? –  Dervall Feb 24 '12 at 12:16
    
You need to be more specific what kind of combinations you want. For example, with S = {1, 2} and r=2, do you want {1,2} and {2,1}, or also {1,1} and {2,2}, or even just {1,2}? –  Joachim Isaksson Feb 24 '12 at 12:17
    
I think he wants this: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Combination. {1,2} {2,1} are the same, and {1,1} and {2,2} are not possible. –  jrok Feb 24 '12 at 12:19
    
For readable algorithms, you can look in the Python documentation: docs.python.org/library/itertools.html –  orlp Feb 24 '12 at 12:22
    
The answer is one google search away –  Alexander Feb 24 '12 at 12:22

9 Answers 9

up vote 27 down vote accepted

A simple way using std::next_permutation:

#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>

int main() {
    int n, r;
    std::cin >> n;
    std::cin >> r;

    std::vector<bool> v(n);
    std::fill(v.begin() + n - r, v.end(), true);

    do {
        for (int i = 0; i < n; ++i) {
            if (v[i]) {
                std::cout << (i+1) << " ";
            }
        }
        std::cout << "\n";
    } while (std::next_permutation(v.begin(), v.end()));
    return 0;
}

or a slight variation that outputs the results in an easier to follow order:

#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>

int main() {
   int n, r;
   std::cin >> n;
   std::cin >> r;

   std::vector<bool> v(n);
   std::fill(v.begin() + r, v.end(), true);

   do {
       for (int i = 0; i < n; ++i) {
           if (!v[i]) {
               std::cout << (i+1) << " ";
           }
       }
       std::cout << "\n";
   } while (std::next_permutation(v.begin(), v.end()));
   return 0;
}

A bit of explanation: It works by creating a "selection array" (v), where we place r selectors, then we create all permutations of these selectors, and print the corresponding set member if it is selected in in the current permutation of v. Hope this helps.

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1  
It will output permutations and not combinations as it was stated in the question. You may find this link helpful –  Igor Chornous Feb 24 '12 at 12:52
6  
No. it'll output combinations. try it maybe? :) –  mitchnull Feb 24 '12 at 12:59
    
I tried it, it outputs nested loop (reverse), something like <code>for (int n = 5; n >= 1; --n) for (int m = n - 1; m >= 1; --m) cout << n << m</code> –  CapelliC Feb 24 '12 at 13:06
3  
hm. either I miss something or you miss something. check this out: ideone.com/tfAGp –  mitchnull Feb 24 '12 at 13:10
4  
@kids_fox This code is correct and it does produce combinations. The reason it works is because it prints all the sorted permutations. –  Sam Hocevar Feb 24 '12 at 13:37

You can implement it if you note that for each level r you select a number from 1 to n.

In C++, we need to 'manually' keep the state between calls that produces results (a combination): so, we build a class that on construction initialize the state, and has a member that on each call returns the combination while there are solutions: for instance

#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>
#include <vector>
#include <cstdlib>

using namespace std;

struct combinations
{
    typedef vector<int> combination_t;

    // initialize status
   combinations(int N, int R) :
       completed(N < 1 || R > N),
       generated(0),
       N(N), R(R)
   {
       for (int c = 1; c <= R; ++c)
           curr.push_back(c);
   }

   // true while there are more solutions
   bool completed;

   // count how many generated
   int generated;

   // get current and compute next combination
   combination_t next()
   {
       combination_t ret = curr;

       // find what to increment
       completed = true;
       for (int i = R - 1; i >= 0; --i)
           if (curr[i] < N - R + i + 1)
           {
               int j = curr[i] + 1;
               while (i <= R)
                   curr[i++] = j++;
               completed = false;
               ++generated;
               break;
           }

       return ret;
   }

private:

   int N, R;
   combination_t curr;
};

int main_combinations(int argc, char **argv)
{
    int N = argc >= 2 ? atoi(argv[1]) : 5;
    int R = argc >= 3 ? atoi(argv[2]) : 2;
    combinations cs(N, R);
    while (!cs.completed)
    {
        combinations::combination_t c = cs.next();
        copy(c.begin(), c.end(), ostream_iterator<int>(cout, ","));
        cout << endl;
    }
    return cs.generated;
}

test output:

1,2,
1,3,
1,4,
1,5,
2,3,
2,4,
2,5,
3,4,
3,5,
4,5,
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I'd suggest figuring out how you would do it on paper yourself and infer pseudocode from that. After that, you only need to decide the way to encode and store the manipulated data.

For ex:

For each result item in result array // 0, 1, ... r
    For each item possible // 0, 1, 2, ... n
        if current item does not exist in the result array
            place item in result array
            exit the inner for
        end if
    end for
end for
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You can use recursion whereby to pick N+1 combinations you pick N combinations then add 1 to it. The 1 you add must always be after the last one of your N, so if your N includes the last element there are no N+1 combinations associated with it.

Perhaps not the most efficient solution but it should work.

Base case would be picking 0 or 1. You could pick 0 and get an empty set. From an empty set you can assume that iterators work between the elements and not at them.

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          #include<iostream>
          using namespace std;

          for(int i=1;i<=5;i++)
             for (int j=2;j<=5;j++) 
                if (i!=j)
                  cout<<i<<","<<j<<","<<endl;

           //or instead of cout... you can put them in a matrix n x 2 and use the solution
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2  
this includes different permutations of the same combination, try modify the 2nd loop for (int j=i+1;j<=5;j++) –  ronalchn Jan 3 '13 at 22:57

Code is similar to generating binary digits. Keep an extra data structure, an array perm[], whose value at index i will tell if ith array element is included or not. And also keep a count variable. Whenever count == length of combination, print elements based on perm[].

#include<stdio.h>

// a[] : given array of chars 
// perm[] : perm[i] is 1 if a[i] is considered, else 0
// index : subscript of perm which is to be 0ed and 1ed
// n     : length of the given input array
// k     : length of the permuted string
void combinate(char a[], int perm[],int index, int n, int k)
{
   static int count = 0;

   if( count == k )
   { 
      for(int i=0; i<n; i++)
        if( perm[i]==1)
          printf("%c",a[i]);
      printf("\n");

    } else if( (n-index)>= (k-count) ){

         perm[index]=1;
         count++;
         combinate(a,perm,index+1,n,k);

         perm[index]=0;
         count--;
         combinate(a,perm,index+1,n,k);

   }
}
int main()
{
   char a[] ={'a','b','c','d'};
   int perm[4] = {0};
   combinate(a,perm,0,4,3);

   return 0;
}
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Dont use turboc –  darkyen00 Aug 1 '13 at 17:41
1  
for the love of the almighty god of code –  darkyen00 Aug 1 '13 at 17:41
void print(int *a, int* s, int ls)
{
    for(int i = 0; i < ls; i++)
    {
        cout << a[s[i]] << " ";
    }
    cout << endl;
}    
void PrintCombinations(int *a, int l, int k, int *s, int ls, int sp)
{
   if(k == 0)
   {
       print(a,s,ls);
       return;
   }
   for(int i = sp; i < l; i++)
   {

      s[k-1] = i;
      PrintCombinations(a,l,k-1,s,ls,i+1);
      s[k-1] = -1;

   }
}

int main()
{
 int e[] = {1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9};
 int s[] = {-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1};
 PrintCombinations(e,9,6,s,6,0);
}
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this is a recursive method, which you can use on any type. you can iterate on an instance of Combinations class (e.g. or get() vector with all combinations, each combination is a vector of objects. This is written in C++11.

//combinations.hpp
#include <vector>

template<typename T> class Combinations {
// Combinations(std::vector<T> s, int m) iterate all Combinations without repetition
// from set s of size m s = {0,1,2,3,4,5} all permuations are: {0, 1, 2}, {0, 1,3}, 
// {0, 1, 4}, {0, 1, 5}, {0, 2, 3}, {0, 2, 4}, {0, 2, 5}, {0, 3, 4}, {0, 3, 5},
// {0, 4, 5}, {1, 2, 3}, {1, 2, 4}, {1, 2, 5}, {1, 3, 4}, {1, 3, 5}, {1, 4, 5}, 
// {2, 3, 4}, {2, 3, 5}, {2, 4, 5}, {3, 4, 5}

public:
    Combinations(std::vector<T> s, int m) : M{m}, set{s}, partial{std::vector<T>(M)} 
    {
        N = s.size(); // unsigned long can't be casted to int in initialization

        out = std::vector<std::vector<T>>(comb(N,M), std::vector<T>(M)); // allocate space

        generate(0, N-1, M-1);
    };

    typedef typename std::vector<std::vector<T>>::const_iterator const_iterator;
    typedef typename std::vector<std::vector<T>>::iterator iterator;
    iterator begin() { return out.begin(); }
    iterator end() { return out.end(); }    
    std::vector<std::vector<T>> get() { return out; }

private:
    void generate(int i, int j, int m);
    unsigned long long comb(unsigned long long n, unsigned long long k); // C(n, k) = n! / (n-k)!

    int N;
    int M;
    std::vector<T> set;
    std::vector<T> partial;
    std::vector<std::vector<T>> out;   

    int count {0}; 
};

template<typename T> 
void Combinations<T>::generate(int i, int j, int m) {  
    // combination of size m (number of slots) out of set[i..j]
    if (m > 0) { 
        for (int z=i; z<j-m+1; z++) { 
            partial[M-m-1]=set[z]; // add element to permutation
            generate(z+1, j, m-1);
        }
    } else {
        // last position
        for (int z=i; z<j-m+1; z++) { 
            partial[M-m-1] = set[z];
            out[count++] = std::vector<T>(partial); // add to output vector
        }
    }
}

template<typename T> 
unsigned long long
Combinations<T>::comb(unsigned long long n, unsigned long long k) {
    // this is from Knuth vol 3

    if (k > n) {
        return 0;
    }
    unsigned long long r = 1;
    for (unsigned long long d = 1; d <= k; ++d) {
        r *= n--;
        r /= d;
    }
    return r;
}

Test file:

// test.cpp
// compile with: gcc -O3 -Wall -std=c++11 -lstdc++ -o test test.cpp
#include <iostream>
#include "combinations.hpp"

struct Bla{
    float x, y, z;
};

int main() {

    std::vector<int> s{0,1,2,3,4,5};
    std::vector<Bla> ss{{1, .4, 5.0},{2, .7, 5.0},{3, .1, 2.0},{4, .66, 99.0}};

    Combinations<int> c(s,3);
    // iterate over all combinations
    for (auto x : c) { for (auto ii : x) std::cout << ii << ", "; std::cout << "\n"; }

    // or get a vector back
    std::vector<std::vector<int>> z = c.get();  

    std::cout << "\n\n";

    Combinations<Bla> cc(ss, 2);
    // combinations of arbitrary objects
    for (auto x : cc) { for (auto b : x) std::cout << "(" << b.x << ", " << b.y << ", " << b.z << "), "; std::cout << "\n"; }    

}

output is :

0, 1, 2, 0, 1, 3, 0, 1, 4, 0, 1, 5, 0, 2, 3, 0, 2, 4, 0, 2, 5, 0, 3, 4, 0, 3, 5, 0, 4, 5, 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 4, 1, 2, 5, 1, 3, 4, 1, 3, 5, 1, 4, 5, 2, 3, 4, 2, 3, 5, 2, 4, 5, 3, 4, 5,

(1, 0.4, 5), (2, 0.7, 5), (1, 0.4, 5), (3, 0.1, 2), (1, 0.4, 5), (4, 0.66, 99), (2, 0.7, 5), (3, 0.1, 2), (2, 0.7, 5), (4, 0.66, 99), (3, 0.1, 2), (4, 0.66, 99),

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public static class CombinationGenerator {
    int n;
    int k;
    Integer[] input;
    List<List<Integer>> output;

    public CombinationGenerator(int n, int k) {
        this.n = n;
        this.k = k;
        input = new Integer[n];
        for (int i = 1; i <= n; i++) {
            input[i-1] = i;
        }
    }

    public List<List<Integer>> generate(){
        if(k>n){
            throw new RuntimeErrorException(null, "K should be less than N");
        }
        output = generate(0, k);
        printOutput();
        return output;
    }

    private List<List<Integer>> generate(int cur, int k) {
        List<List<Integer>> output = new ArrayList<List<Integer>>();
        int length = input.length - cur;
        if(length == k){
            List<Integer> result = new ArrayList<Integer>();
            for (int i = cur; i < input.length; i++) {
                result.add(input[i]);
            }
            output.add(result);
        }
        else if( k == 1){
            for (int i = cur; i < input.length; i++) {
                List<Integer> result = new ArrayList<Integer>();
                result.add(input[i]);
                output.add(result);
            }
        }
        else{
            for (int i = cur; i < input.length; i++) {
                List<List<Integer>> partialResult = generate(i+1, k-1);
                for (Iterator<List<Integer>> iterator = partialResult.iterator(); iterator
                        .hasNext();) {
                    List<Integer> list = (List<Integer>) iterator.next();
                    list.add(input[i]);
                }
                output.addAll(partialResult);
            }
        }
        return output;
    }
    private void printOutput(){
        for (Iterator<List<Integer>> iterator = output.iterator(); iterator
                .hasNext();) {
            printList((List<Integer>) iterator.next());
        }
    }
    private void printList(List<Integer> next) {
        for (Iterator<Integer> iterator = next.iterator(); iterator.hasNext();) {
            Integer integer = (Integer) iterator.next();
            System.out.print(integer.intValue());
        }
        System.out.print("\n");
    }


}
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