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At jameslist.com we can see the following times it takes from request to completed pageview;

  • Server processing a request: (php, memcached, db, sphinx + internal network latency): 150ms

  • Time spent in network: 650ms

  • Time spent in DOM: 1200ms

  • Time spent render page: 1650ms

That is in total about 3.7 seconds from request to fully loaded webpage. In avarage, is this good, ok or perhaps bad? When it comes to breakdown of the above points, what could be expected of sites with similar content?

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I would suggest google's search times are good for simple pages. I just did a search which took 130 ms and that sounds fine.

The more complex the page, the longer the time which is acceptable. e.g. a site which gets you insurance quotes from dozens of suppliers could reasonably take 10 seconds.

The rest sounds pretty lengthy to me but I know more about high frequency trading where 1 ms is pretty poor. ;)

Time spent in network: 650ms

That's a hell of a network, you could send a request around the world in this time.

Time spent in DOM: 1200ms

Time spent render page: 1650ms

I would be wondering why this is significantly higher than the "real" work which is about 150 ms.

A request from London to New York and back should be about 100 ms. My guess is 150 ms (request) + 150 ms (parsing and rendering) + 100 ms (internet) is good.

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Thanks for your comments Peter. I have gathered the data from newrelic (amazing monitoring system) for about a day and it gives us pretty much the "real, avarage" data in terms of how the real world looks like, that is new/old visitors, visitors from places around the world with bad connection, etc. The "best" situaton with cached content, optimal network and so on is of course a lot better. – Sebastian Öblom Feb 24 '12 at 15:19
    
The size of data is your best indication of whether this is reasonable. The larger the data, the longer you should expect the result to take. – Peter Lawrey Feb 24 '12 at 15:51

3.7 seconds end to end is pretty decent - on the fast side of average, I'd say.

I'm assuming your network time is the total time - it's not terrible, and mostly determined by file size and bandwidth. I've had a quick look at your site, and nothing out of the ordinary seems to be going on.

DOM and render time are a little high. Not freakishly so, but there may be some low-hanging fruit.

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Target time for page to be generated and sent to the visitor is 150..300ms. All the important page content has to be loaded within one second from initial request.

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