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I come across this:

html,body,div,span,object,iframe,h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6,p,blockquote,pre,abbr,address,cite,code,del,dfn,em,img,ins,kbd,q,samp,small,strong,sub,sup,var,b,i,d
l,dt,dd,ol,ul,li,fieldset,form,label,legend,table,caption,tbody,tfoot,thead,tr,th,td,article,aside,figure,footer,header,hgroup,menu,nav,section,menu,time,mark,audio,video{background:transparent;border:0;font-size:100%;list-style:none;margin:0;padding:0;outline:0;vertical-align:baseline;}

The comment mention reset,
I guess is used to reset the attribute to default state.
However, margin, padding, border
does not seems applicable to a, or b / strong,
what is the point to have this huge reset?

And does this slow down rendering?
(these attributes ALMOST inherit to all elements)

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The point is browser consistency. CSS doesn't give a clear definition of the initial state for each element, as a consequence, the same page may display differently depending on the browser

As far as rendering speed, you don't have to worry about it.

BTW, an excellent css reset can be found at http://meyerweb.com/eric/tools/css/reset/

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+1 for the link –  ajreal Feb 24 '12 at 14:56
1  
To add, using a reset requires a little more work, since you will have to manually set margins on things that had margins before (such as paragraphs), but any extra work is worth it in the long run, since you won't have to do as much work debugging design problems in each of the major browsers. –  Derreck Dean Feb 24 '12 at 14:57

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