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int * const const * b

What does it mean? cdecl says declare b as pointer to const const pointer to int. Can someone explain it?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

const const is redundant, it will reduce to const.

So let's rewrite that:

int * const *b;

So b is a pointer to a const pointer to an int. With an example:

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
    int i = 5;
    int *ip = &i;
    int * const const * b = &ip;

    (**b)++; /* legal */
    (*b)++; /* illegal */
    (b)++; /* legal */

    return 0;
}
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Also see that question, this is valid C99, but not valid C++ nor valid C89.

It's just a pointer to a const pointer to an integer. Const applies to what is on its left unless there is nothing on its left: then it applies on the right.

Here you just have redundant redundancy, which is repeated such that you're really sure that it is const and will not mutate.

Here you just have redundant redundancy, which is repeated such that you're really sure that it is const and will not mutate.

Even cdecl.org tells that b is pointer to const const pointer to int.

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The general solution to confusing declarations: read it backwards. Though in this case, you should first remove the redundant const.

So this:

int * const * b;

Becomes:

b      // b is a 
*      // pointer to
const  // a constant
*      // pointer to
int    // an int

In English, therefore: a pointer to a constant pointer to int.

As others have mentioned, this is a version of int **.

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It is the same as :

int * const * b;

which is a pointer to a const pointer to int.

const const is legal in C99/C11 and is the same as const:

(C99, 6.7.3p4) "If the same qualifier appears more than once in the same specifier-qualifier-list, either directly or via one or more typedefs, the behavior is the same as if it appeared only once."

But this is a constraint violation in C89:

(C90, 6.5.3) "The same type qualifier shall not appear more than once in the same specifier list or qualifier list, either directly or via one or more typedefs."

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This is basically an int ** or a pointer to a pointer to an int or a pointer to an int array (where int * is a way of referencing an int[]

The const located after the int * means the pointer cannot be modified (though it's contents can) which is the opposite of const int *.

The second const is superflouous nad ignored.

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