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This question shows that cygwin’s soft links are somewhat different from ntfs junctions. I’d like cygwin to create a real junction. I thought about running mklink but, hell, there is no mklink.exeApparently, it’s part of the shell command. There I’m stuck.

Any idea how I can do that on a script ?

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up vote 5 down vote accepted

Found the answer, running cmd.exe /c mklink /j name target did the job. I leave the answer here in case someone runs into the same trouble.

EDIT: Added /j switch as pointed out by Ken Williams in the comments.

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If you want an actual junction, then you probably should use the /j flag: cmd /c mklink /j name target. Otherwise according to technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc753194.aspx I think you end up with a Windows-style file symbolic link. –  Ken Williams Sep 12 '13 at 15:04
    
The recent windows native symlinks have advantages over the more limited junction points, which aren't treated correctly by some software (e.g., anything running on the java jvm, for example). See stackoverflow.com/questions/3648819/… –  philwalk Nov 11 at 19:06

FYI, The recent windows native symlinks have advantages over the more limited junction points, which aren't treated correctly by some software (e.g., anything running on the java jvm, for example). Recent versions of CYGWIN are able to directly manage native windows symlinks without using special tricks.
See How to make symbolic link with cygwin in Windows 7.

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