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I know LINQ can group by taking advantage of anonymous types, so I though it would also group by if I used my own object for grouping. However, it is not (at least in my usage).

for example, using the following anonymous type groups by the two parameters I want it to:

.GroupBy(v => new { v.GroupId })

But once I use my own object, it no longer does the grouping:

.GroupBy(v => new MyGrouping { GroupId = v.GroupId })

With the following object

 private class MyGrouping : IMyGrouping
 {
     public int GroupId { get; set; }

     public override bool Equals(object obj) { return Equals((MyGrouping)obj); }
     public bool Equals(MyGrouping obj)
     {
         return this.GroupId == obj.GroupId ;
     }
 }

Am I missing something in my own object, or is this not supported?


As every poster pointed out, my Equals implementation was flawed so I revised it using Resharper recommended equality check just to be different and its grouping as expected.

 private class MyGrouping : IMyGrouping
 {
     public int GroupId { get; set; }

     public override bool Equals(object obj)
     {
         var myGrouping = obj as MyGrouping;
         return myGrouping != null ? Equals(myGrouping) : false;
     }
     public bool Equals(MyGrouping other)
     {
         if (ReferenceEquals(null, other)) return false;
         if (ReferenceEquals(this, other)) return true;
         return other.GroupId == GroupId;
     }

     public override int GetHashCode()
     {
         return GroupId;
     }
 }

For me though, this is a bit of a failuer as my goal was to cut down code... my previous implementation was grouping by a dynamic variable, so I may reconsider this now.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There are definitely some issues with your MyGrouping class.

First, your overriden Equals method has infinite recursion if it is ever called because you never cast the object to your specific type. Second, you don't override the GetHashCode() method (which you should always do if you override Equals()). Third, if you're implementing a custom Equals method for your specific type, you should also add the IEquatable<T> interface to your class.

My class would look something like:

private class MyGrouping : IMyGrouping, IEquatable<IMyGrouping>
{
    public int GroupId { get; set; }

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        if(obj == null) return false;
        if(GetType() != obj.GetType()) return false;
        return Equals(obj as MyGrouping);
    }

    public override bool GetHashCode()
    {
        return GroupId.GetHashCode();
    }

    public bool Equals(IMyGrouping obj)
    {
        if(obj == null) return false;
        return GroupId == obj.GroupId;
    }
}
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I've not seen IEquatable<T> before. I'll fix up my class and see if it is the cause. –  Arkiliknam Feb 24 '12 at 15:40
1  
@Arkiliknam - The most likely cause is the fact that you didn't override GetHashCode. –  Justin Niessner Feb 24 '12 at 15:41
    
I didn't want to write all this code on equality, do you know if this is still needed if I were to use a struct instead (though it'd probably be worse efficiency)? –  Arkiliknam Feb 24 '12 at 15:42
    
@Arkiliknam - Yep. But if you're only using one field to compare equality in your class, why do you need it at all? –  Justin Niessner Feb 24 '12 at 15:46
    
True, but in my code I have multiple Grouping objects with varried GroupBy properties, eg SimpleGrouping{GroupById} ComplexGrouping{GroupById, AlsoGroupById} –  Arkiliknam Feb 24 '12 at 15:48

First of all your override of Equals is bad, first try with:

public override bool Equals(object obj)
{
  if (obj == null)
     return false;
  if (this.GetType() != obj.GetType())
     return false;
  return this.GroupID == ((MyGrouping)obj).GroupId;
}
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Your Equals method is also much more complicated than it needs to be. Rather than calling GetType(), you can use the as operator to attempt the cast. If the cast fails, the result will be null and you know to return false. –  Justin Niessner Feb 24 '12 at 15:40
    
Correctness of your statement is questionable. You are not taking into consideration consequences of inheritance. For general purposes this is better way to implement Equals. –  watbywbarif Feb 24 '12 at 15:46
    
The as operator would work the same way as your last cast and work fine when used in inheritance situations. –  Justin Niessner Feb 24 '12 at 15:48
    
No it wouldn't, it would allow that ClassA obj1, and ClassAChild obj2 are equal if inherited fields are equal, but you don't want that in many cases. I prefer default where they aren't equal, and I allow them to be equal only when this is required behavior. –  watbywbarif Feb 24 '12 at 15:53
    
Good call. Forgot about that part. –  Justin Niessner Feb 24 '12 at 16:00

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