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I have a web server where I run some slow-starting programs as daemons. These sometimes need quick restarting (or stopping) when I recompile them or switch to another installation of them.

Inspired by http://mywiki.wooledge.org/ProcessManagement, I'm writing a script called daemonise.sh that looks like

#!/bin/sh
while :; do
    ./myprogram lotsadata.xml
    echo "Restarting server..." 1>&2
done

to keep a "daemon" running. Since I sometimes need to stop it, or just restart it, I run that script in a screen session, like:

$ ./daemonise.sh & DPID=$!
$ screen -d

Then perhaps I recompile myprogram, install it to a new path, start the new one up and want to kill the old one:

$ screen -r
$ kill $DPID
$ screen -d

This works fine when I'm the only maintainer, but now I want to let someone else stop/restart the program, no matter who started it. And to make things more complicated, the daemonise.sh script in fact starts about 16 programs, making it a hassle to kill every single one if you don't know their PIDs.

What would be the "best practices" way of letting another user stop/restart the daemons?

I thought about shared screen sessions, but that just sounds hacky and insecure. The best solution I've come up with for now is to wrap starting and killing in a script that catches certain signals:

#!/bin/bash
DPID=
trap './daemonise.sh & DPID=$!' USR1
trap 'kill $DPID' USR2 EXIT

# Ensure trapper wrapper doesn't exit:
while :; do
    sleep 10000 & wait $!
done

Now, should another user need to stop the daemons and I can't do it, she just has to know the pid of the wrapper, and e.g. sudo kill -s USR2 $wrapperpid. (Also, this makes it possible to run the daemons on reboots, and still kill them cleanly.)

Is there a better solution? Are there obvious problems with this solution that I'm not seeing?

(After reading Greg's Bash Wiki, I'd like to avoid any solution involving pgrep or PID-files …)

share|improve this question
1  
+1 for link the Greg's Bash Wiki. Good luck! – shellter Feb 24 '12 at 15:51
1  
pid files are the best convention – reconbot Feb 24 '12 at 18:27
    
@wizard is right. you won't get a worthwhile answer because you're basically saying "i know the wheel exists, but i want to invent my own". – Christopher Neylan Feb 24 '12 at 18:54
    
I agree with @wizard : My conclusion after a quick read of the links you provided, was that pid based solution is best, AND if you need to allow for a dead shell wrapper, then you have to get the pid from a file. Did you miss the part about the correct naming of PID-files, you must make it uniq in a way that your app can deal with and not be overwritten by rouge processes (or worse!). Also did you notice the msg 'if you need to manage a complex suite of child processes and events, don't try to do it in a shell script.'? Finally I think your prblem is likely too big in scope for S.O. GdLk! – shellter Feb 24 '12 at 18:56
1  
@shellter You don't have to get the PID from a file. The option in my question shows that you don't. It works, but I'm asking because I am unsure if there are pitfalls. The thing is, with using PID files, I know there are pitfalls, as listed quite clearly on mywiki.wooledge.org/ProcessManagement I guess the dangers can be alleviated by running a dedicated UID, but if I can avoid the danger altogether, I'd rather that. I know PID files are a common convention, but common!=best. – unhammer Feb 25 '12 at 21:59

I recommend a PID based init script. Anyone with sudo privileged to the script will be able to start and stop the server processes.

share|improve this answer
1  
"PID based"? You mean PID-file based? If I am going to let other users sudo stop 16 processes at once on a server, I do not want to risk the PID's pointing to the wrong processes. How would you ensure none of the processes have stopped and given their PIDs to other processes without controlling them from a parent? – unhammer Feb 25 '12 at 21:51
1  
Let your programs create and cleanup their own pid files. The chances that a program will crash and it's pid be given out to another process is quite low (it would have to wrap around all available pids usually a 64 bit int). If you are still concerned then take a look at what the processes is before you kill it. (/proc/PID/cmdline is an easy way.) – reconbot Feb 26 '12 at 22:39
1  
@wizard: Which platform was that on? I'm running 64-bit Ubuntu 11.10, and /proc/sys/kernel/pid_max says 32768. That does not take a long time to wrap. – l0b0 Feb 27 '12 at 12:21

On improving your approach: wouldn't it be advisable to make sure that your sleep command in sleep 10000 & wait $! gets properly terminated if your pidwrapper script exits somehow?

Otherwise there would remain a dangling sleep process in the process table for quite some time.

Similarly, wouldn't it be cleaner to terminate myprogram in daemonise.sh properly on restart (i. e. if daemonise.sh receives a TERM signal)?

In addition, it is possible to suppress job notification messages and test for pid existence before killing.

#!/bin/sh
# cat daemonise.sh

# cf. "How to suppress Terminated message after killing in bash?",
# http://stackoverflow.com/q/81520

trap '
   echo "server shut down..." 1>&2
   kill $spid1 $spid2 $spid3 &&
      wait  $spid1 $spid2 $spid3 2>/dev/null
   exit
' TERM

while :; do
    echo "Starting server..." 1>&2
    #./myprogram lotsadata.xml
    sleep 100 &
    spid1=${!}
    sleep 100 &
    spid2=${!}
    sleep 100 &
    spid3=${!}
    wait
    echo "Restarting server..." 1>&2
done

#------------------------------------------------------------

#!/bin/bash
# cat pidwrapper

DPID=

trap '
   kill -0 ${!} 2>/dev/null && kill ${!} && wait ${!} 2>/dev/null
   ./daemonise.sh & DPID=${!}
' USR1

trap '
   kill -0 ${!} 2>/dev/null && kill ${!} && wait ${!} 2>/dev/null
   kill -0 $DPID 2>/dev/null && kill $DPID && wait ${DPID} 2>/dev/null
' USR2 

trap '
   trap - EXIT
   kill -0 $DPID 2>/dev/null && kill $DPID && wait ${DPID} 2>/dev/null
   kill -0 ${!} 2>/dev/null && kill ${!} && wait ${!} 2>/dev/null
   exit 0
' EXIT

# Ensure trapper wrapper does not exit:
while :; do
    sleep 10000 & wait $!
done

#------------------------------------------------------------

# test

{
wrapperpid="`exec sh -c './pidwrapper & echo ${!}' | head -1`"
echo "wrapperpid: $wrapperpid"
for n in 1 2 3 4 5; do
   sleep 2
   # start daemonise.sh
   kill -s USR1 $wrapperpid 
   sleep 2
   # kill daemonise.sh
   kill -s USR2 $wrapperpid 
done
sleep 2
echo kill $wrapperpid
kill $wrapperpid
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah … I actually prefer seeing what has been terminated :-) but yeah that works. Hadn't thought about the stray sleep process from the wrapper. – unhammer Mar 13 '13 at 8:45

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