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I am trying to learn how to write custom annotations in Java.

For learning purposes, I decided to try to create an annotation that make a field available for a class using the annotation, ie: injection but not necessary as a singleton to keep it a bit more simple ( I think ), but that is welcome as well.

=================================CLASS 1=================================

import java.lang.annotation.ElementType;
import java.lang.annotation.Inherited;
import java.lang.annotation.Retention;
import java.lang.annotation.RetentionPolicy;
import java.lang.annotation.Target;


@Target(ElementType.METHOD)
@Retention(RetentionPolicy.RUNTIME)
@Inherited
public @interface AutoInject {

}

=================================CLASS 2=================================

// The class to be injected in Main.java
public class TestClass0 {

    void printSomething(){
        System.out.println("PrintSomething: TestClass0");
    }

}

=================================CLASS 3=================================

import java.lang.annotation.Annotation;
import java.lang.reflect.Field;

public class Main {

    TestClass0 ts0; 
    // Injecting here!!
    @AutoInject
    public TestClass0 getTso() {
        return ts0;
    }
    public void setTso(TestClass0 ts) {
        ts0 = ts;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        performAnnotationScanOnClass (Main.class);

        // Create instance 
        Main main = new Main();     
        main.getTso().printSomething();

    }

    public static void performAnnotationScanOnClass(Class<?> clazz) {
        Field[] fields = clazz.getDeclaredFields();

        for ( Field field : fields ) {

             Annotation[] annotations = field.getAnnotations();
             for (Annotation annotation : annotations) {

                 if ( annotation instanceof AutoInject ) {
                     AutoInject autoInject = (AutoInject) annotation;

//                     if ( field.get( ... ) == null )
//                         field.set( ... , value)
                 }

             }

        }
    }

}

As you can see in the static void main() ... I am trying to call the method in TestClass0, expecting it to be available. I know that the above is long from near completion, but I just started learning annotations and would like your guidance.

How can we fire a piece of code, that initializez a property either on new or when the get method is called. Using annotations. I am thinking without altering invoke method.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
You think your testing annotations, but you're really reinventing CDI. Don't ... reinvent ... the wheel. –  Perception Feb 24 '12 at 15:52
6  
I am not reinventing anything. I am trying to learn what and how others have achieved and created, not use it. You understand the difference? Its for educational purpose. –  SecretService Feb 24 '12 at 16:24
    
Alrighty, well good luck with it then! I'm sure you'll learn alot. –  Perception Feb 24 '12 at 17:09

1 Answer 1

You are iterating over fields in your scan code, but the annotation you defined only allows annotation on methods. This means you'll never see any annotations.

It looks like you are trying to use fields like they were java beans properties. Here's an example of setter injection using your AutoInject and TestClass0 classes as-is:

Main.java:

import java.beans.BeanInfo;
import java.beans.Introspector;
import java.beans.PropertyDescriptor;
import java.lang.annotation.Annotation;
import java.lang.reflect.Method;

public class Main {
    public TestClass0 ts0;

    public TestClass0 getTso() {
        return ts0;
    }

    @AutoInject
    public void setTso(TestClass0 ts) {
        ts0 = ts;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        // Create instance
        Main main = new Main();
        injectDependencies(main).getTso().printSomething();

    }

    public static <T> T injectDependencies(final T obj) {
        try {
            Class clazz = obj.getClass();
            BeanInfo beanInfo = Introspector.getBeanInfo(clazz);

            for (PropertyDescriptor pd : beanInfo.getPropertyDescriptors()) {
                Method readMethod = pd.getReadMethod();
                Method writeMethod = pd.getWriteMethod();

                if (writeMethod == null) {
                    continue;
                }

                Object existingVal = pd.getReadMethod().invoke(obj);
                if (existingVal == null) {
                    for (Annotation annotation : writeMethod.getAnnotations()) {
                        if (annotation instanceof AutoInject) {
                            Class propertyType = pd.getPropertyType();
                            writeMethod.invoke(obj, propertyType.newInstance());
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        } catch (Exception e) {
            // do something intelligent :)
        }
        return obj;
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
Hi, looks nice, but you are passing the actual object of main. If you create a new main object you will have to recall that method, right? If you for example look at Spring injection, when you do new Main() you will have some dependencies, auto injected ( usually a singleton object). The idea is that you scan all class files one time ( at startup) and make each new object have some added behaviour. –  SecretService Feb 27 '12 at 8:22
    
Spring uses a central context to create/deliver all objects (ApplicationContext). My code does not, as I was trying to illustrate just how the annotation related code worked. There is nothing about the injection code that is tied to this main class, you could just as easily put it in your own homebrew Injector class that reads in your configuration and takes requests for object creation / service location. –  Pleepleus Feb 27 '12 at 14:59

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