Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a class 'search' which is only used under sertain circumstances. The decision whether 'search' is needed or not is made in the class 'page' in the function 'setupPage'. Is it okay (is it good coding), to include a class within another class?

class Page {
    private function setupPage($page_id){
        switch($page_id){
            case 1:
            // do something
            break;

            case 2:
            include_once('class_search.php');
            // class search is singleton
            $this->search = Search::getInstance();
            // now I can use functions of 'search'
            $this->search->someSearchFunction();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

it is absolutely fine to do so, but you have other alternative too. you might want to look at php's autoloading function

function __autoload($class_name) {
    include $class_name . '.php';
}

whenever you instantiate a new class. PHP automagically calls the __autoload function with one argument i.e the class name. consider the below example

$user = new User():

when you instantiate the user object here the autoload function is called, it tries include the file from the same directory. (with reference to above autoload function). now you could implement your own logic to autoload classes. no matter in which directory it resides. for more information check out this link http://in.php.net/autoload.

share|improve this answer

I wouldn't do this. If you want your classes only be loaded, if they are needed, I suggest you use PHP's autoloading for this. Here is the Documentation.

share|improve this answer
1  
Though there's nothing wrong with manually loading the class, I agree that autoloading would be the way to go. It's essentially the same thing, it just looks better because the include is implied. It also gives you more consistent loading since a change to the function makes it simpler than changing all instances of include() should a path change occur. – Crashspeeder Feb 24 '12 at 16:40

This shouldn't be a problem, if you use autoloading this very thing would be happening.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.