Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Ubuntu 11.10, Python 2.6. Background: I have an existing Python app that is using Twisted to sit in a loop and wait for RESTful commands to come in. So the app starts up, kicks off threads that do various things, and main sets up callbacks for Twisted, then calls Twisted.reactor.run(), which blocks forever. When a request comes in, the appropriate handler is called, stuff happens, a reply is sent back.

My job is now to remove Twisted because management has decided they don't like it. We're moving to Apache as our web server.

Using the documentation, I have successfully installed and configured Apache2.0 to serve web pages. I also installed mod_wsgi, and was able to configure it and Apache to execute arbitrary Python code when a request comes in. So I'm good on that side.

What I'm missing is how to connect my Python application to the Apache/mod_wsgi bits, since the application needs to be persistent and always running. It was suggested that I open a pipe between my wsgi script and my main application, and serialize the requests that way. But it seems like this is something that should already be out there, I just don't know enough to know what to search for.

Any pushes in the right direction are greatly appreciated.

Further edit for clarity: I'm not making a webserver. The application in question is a host app that is running on a virtual machine. It happens to be controlled by a RESTful interface via HTTP. So all it needs to do is be able to listen for incoming commands and reply to them.

mod_wsgi may not be the proper tool for this job, which is fine, I just don't know what is.

share|improve this question
    
"It still seems a little awkward to rely on Apache to run my whole application". Bad idea. It's a really good thing. Better yet, Apache can ease the workload by serving static content so your application doesn't have to. –  S.Lott Feb 24 '12 at 20:52
    
Which code are we supposed to look at? Do you understand that you do not have a "main" script anymore? Do you know that mod_wsgi calls your application as needed to process each request? Have you read the WSGI standard document? Can you remove the extra code and provide a focused question that states what's actually wrong? –  S.Lott Feb 24 '12 at 20:56
    
@S.Lott: I do understand that, which is really the source of my question in the first place. What I'm trying to understand is how that will fit with an application that is constantly running, but also needs to listen for incoming http requests. The Twisted library it's currently using gives it that by accepting callback functions that get executed when a request comes in. The two versions of the code were provided to document what I've tried so far. –  JoeFish Feb 24 '12 at 21:04
    
Apache pipes to mod_wsgi, mod_wsgi calls just your application. The very idea of "constantly running" is specious for web applications. Can you remove the extra code and provide a focused question that states what's actually wrong? I'm sure you've tried many things. It helps to pick one that illustrates the problem you're having so we can solve that problem. –  S.Lott Feb 24 '12 at 21:07
    
@S.Lott: to elaborate a little further, I also understand mod_wsgi may not be the appropriate vehicle for this. I'm hoping to learn what would be, if mod_wsgi is not. –  JoeFish Feb 24 '12 at 21:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It was suggested that I open a pipe between my wsgi script and my main application, and serialize the requests that way.

That's what multiprocessing queues are for.

http://docs.python.org/library/multiprocessing.html

http://docs.python.org/library/multiprocessing.html#pipes-and-queues

You'll be even happier if you start using Celery.

Celery will allow you to "remove Twisted because management has decided they don't like it."

However. Switch to celery means that things like "So the app starts up, kicks off threads that do various things, and main sets up callbacks for Twisted, then calls Twisted.reactor.run(), which blocks forever" all have to be completely rethought. Instead of some main polling loop, you now have multiple, independent processes that are coordinated by celery.

What you'll find is all the housekeeping in your application -- all the coordination among threads -- the callbacks -- all that -- will go away. You'll be left with a few Python scripts that do the "real work" and Celery to manage the distributed task queue.

share|improve this answer

Does the daemon mode of mod_wsgi offer enough persistence in your case? Or if you want to run the main process separately from Apache, how about mod_fastcgi? Maybe running Apache as a reverse proxy could be an option too.

share|improve this answer
    
I did try running in daemon mode, but that seemed to just buy me not having to do an apachectl restart when I changed my script. It still executed a new instance of the script every time a request came in, so I'm in the same boat as far as I can tell. I will look into mod_fastcgi, thanks. –  JoeFish Feb 24 '12 at 17:53
1  
In the daemon mode the process(es) is/are kept running during subsequent requests (as the "daemon" name suggests), unless you set the maximum-requests option. Can you post your configuration and/or your wsgi python handler? –  jholster Feb 24 '12 at 18:12
    
I will add both to my OP. Maybe I just don't understand what the handler should look like, or exactly what I should be giving to the Apache daemon thread as the handler. –  JoeFish Feb 24 '12 at 19:16
    
WSGI server expects an application callable. Unless you want to implement the whole stack by yourself (routing etc.), werkzeug or flask may be worth a look, just to mention few. –  jholster Feb 24 '12 at 19:46
    
So read your code. "So subsequent queries do increment incoming var [...] but obviously my run.py code isn't running.". Sorry I can't follow you here; you are able to output to the browser while keeping the process running, so if you actually call your application code in incoming, how doesn't it work as expected? –  jholster Feb 24 '12 at 21:14

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.