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I currently have a number of web applications which access a common service running in JBoss 5.0. The service is very simple, using Guice and POJOs. The web applications are authenticated and know who the user is and what roles they have. When calling the service how should I pass this authentication information to the service?

It would seem the simple approach is to simply add a parameter to the interface to take the user information. Possibly a Subject. But this has the downside of cluttering up the interface with contextual information that isn't specific to the job in hand.

void doSomething(Subject subject, ...) {
}

The alternative I have seen is to use ThreadLocal storage, put the user information in there before making the call and make this accessible via some utility class that the service can use. This cleans up the interface but hides the fact that the client of the service has to set the user information before making the call.

Is there another way of doing this? I get the feeling the AOP may be of use here too but can't quite see how. Is there some "best practice" I am missing? Would EJB help?

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I have since come across Apache Shiro which addresses this issue. Not sure how but it does it. –  pauli May 14 '12 at 9:16
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This cleans up the interface but hides the fact that the client of the service has to set the user information before making the call.

True, but if you need to pass something to a particular method across the application then you are defeating the purpose of using Dependency Injection. It's there so that you don't have to pass a bunch of services and objects to other services and objects and so forth, they are created with everything they need.

Is there another way of doing this? I get the feeling the AOP may be of use here too but can't quite see how. Is there some "best practice" I am missing? Would EJB help?

The other way of doing this would be to use a single filter on every Servlet that calls the services that need the Subject / User. Set the user in the filter, and clear the user at the end in a try-finally block. In fact, OWASP Esapi uses this style when setting their ThreadLocalUser, it allows the User to be available in every part of the application.

Something like this:

@Singleton
public MyUserFilter extends FilterOfTheMonth {

    private final Provider<Authenticator> authProvider;

    @Inject
    MyUserFilter(Provider<Authenticator> auth) {
        this.authProvider = auth;
    }

    public void doFilter(ServletRequest request, ServletResponse response, 
            FilterChain chain) throws java.io.IOException, ServletException {
        try {
            // Authenticate and SET the current user utilizing the request and/or                       
            // session objects
            authProvider.get().authenticateUser(HttpRequest currentRequest);

            // Continue on here along the servlet chain
            ... other processing
        } finally {
            authProvider.get().getRidOfCurrentUser();
        }
    }
}
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You're right, dependency injection is the way to go. I am using it throughout the web app and in the service already - but the two are completely separate which is why its not quite so straightforward to do what you suggest. I think I'll DI an auth provider like you suggested and then in the impl use thread local storage to set/access my auth info. This'll be hidden from the service anyway as it'll just use the DI'ed auth provider. –  pauli Feb 28 '12 at 16:29
    
You're right. Owasp ESAPI is currently trying to make an API that utilizes DI. I would just make sure that everything else in the AuthImpl is thread-safe, and don't forget about the perils of Scope-Widening Injection when using those darn stateful Singletons. Good luck. –  oberger Mar 1 '12 at 3:11
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Have you considered moving the authentication process to the common service? Then you only need the session ID in the common service to identify all information about the user the request is coming from.

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