Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I know that the order in which a database stores data in a table is random - provided there is no primary key. My question is, fundamentally, what's going on when the data changes order after a query? If one opened a database, closed it and opened it again to find the data in a different order, what's going on when that happens?

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Its, probably, the question about realization - so it depends on what DBMS you're using.

The simplest answer - data from this table gone out of DBMS cache and will be read from disk in arbitrary order, if not specified with explicit ORDER BY operator.

The main issue of non-existing primary key - the loss of data consistency. The only reason for table not to have primary key - when the table is a staging (buffer) table.

share|improve this answer

I think you're confusing a number of related concepts.

A primary key is a conceptual thing. It's the unique identifier for a record in a relational database.

Primary keys are often implemented through unique indices. On some database systems, you can specify these as "clustered"; these affect the physical ordering of the data on disk.

The order in which data is returned is controlled firstly by the "order by" clause; if that's not available, it's not defined - each database is free to implement this as it wants to.

In practice, that means "in the order in which it's stored on disk"; if there's a clustered index, it will be in that order; if there isn't, it could be whatever's in the query cache, or the order in which the records are stored on disk.

share|improve this answer
    
" it could be whatever's in the query cache" this is what I was going for. what factors determine this? –  wootscootinboogie Feb 24 '12 at 17:28

I know that the order in which a database stores data in a table is random - provided there is no primary key.

Actually, this assumption is not valid. Declaring a primary key doesn't require the database to lay out the data in some particular order in disk. The only thing that it does is require the database to guarantee that there are no rows with duplicate keys.

Now, how does the database guarantee that? The short answer is in any way it chooses to; as long as it works, database implementers are free to pick anything. The most common mechanism creates a unique index and uses it to guarantee uniqueness; the index is ordered, but the table isn't.

But RDBMSs often offer alternative strategies to do the same thing; e.g., index-organized tables, an optional feature available in Oracle, follows the strategy of keeping the table itself ordered. This has some advantages and disadvantages compared to the default strategy (promotes better performance for some kinds of queries, but uses more disk space).

And this is, after all, the point of database systems: you define the data's schema in high-level terms (tables, keys, constraints), and the RDBMS decides how to organize the data. We give the RDBMS a lot of freedom on how it chooses to do so because we want the smart folks who design and implement database systems to invent newer and better ways of doing the same thing.

My question is, fundamentally, what's going on when the data changes order after a query? If one opened a database, closed it and opened it again to find the data in a different order, what's going on when that happens?

Well, first of all, unless you tell the database that you want the query results in a specific order (with an ORDER BY), it's allowed to return the results in any order it likes.

The most common reason: the database has picked different execution plans, and these plans use different indexes on the same table. Different indexes have different orders, so different choice of index leads to different order of results.

There can be other reasons, however. For example, some databases may execute different pieces of your query in parallel, and in this case, it's not predetermined which rows will be available first. The key thing, again, is that the fact that there's no predefined order in which the rows must be produced allows the database implementors to pick alternative strategies based on what they think will be fastest.

share|improve this answer
    
"The most common mechanism creates a unique index and uses it to guarantee uniqueness; the index is ordered, but the table isn't." that is a good summation and explanation of my misconception. thanks! –  wootscootinboogie Feb 24 '12 at 18:06

Provided that you're not ordering using ORDER BY, the database is basically free to return things in the order that is most convenient for it to do so.

Some examples of ways it could order;

  • Return results in the order rows were inserted. This will most likely returns rows in the same order every time.
  • Returns results in the order they show up in an index. Since indexes can be rebuilt at any time by some databases, things may not always show up in the same order, especially after an INSERT/UPDATE/DELETE.
  • Return cached results first, return results it has to read from disk as they show up. This will make the first results from the query show up quickly, but results will show up in a totally unpredictable order every time you execute the query.

In other words, don't trust the order unless you explicitly ask for it, the database may surprise you by optimizing things for your benefit.

Also note that this fundamentally has nothing to do with a primary key which has no impact on ordering unless you ORDER BY on it. It's just a convenient and non changing way to reference the result from another table.

share|improve this answer
    
all good answers and things that i was looking for. gracias, amigos! –  wootscootinboogie Feb 24 '12 at 17:30

"But someone asked me the other day WHY the data changes order and I didn't know."

The reason is that absence of "inherent" ordering is one of the most fundamental properties of the relational model. The set {1 2} is the very same set as the set {2 1}, and the relational model has its origins in set theory.

share|improve this answer

You can implement programmatic keys - manage data via programming logic; neverthelss this is not a good practice. In addition, data without primary keys can't be properly managed by DBMS- data consistency can be (and will be) compromised

share|improve this answer
    
I know it's poor practice and I would never do it. But someone asked me the other day WHY the data changes order and I didn't know. –  wootscootinboogie Feb 24 '12 at 17:12
1  
Well, primary keys LINK different pieces together. Think about it as bunch of stuff og your table, and some of this stuff is connected with the string. You can pull whole chain since it is connected. But cut the string, and stuff will get lost. That's the essential role of PK- maintain data integrity. –  Andrew Feb 24 '12 at 17:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.