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Let's asssume, that we have a template funcion:

template<typename T1, typename T2, typename T3>
T3 such_fun(T1 a, T2 b) {
    // do something...
}

and now we want to use it as an argument in another template, e.g. like that

template<typename T1, template<typename, typename, typename> some_function>
void big_fun(T1 a) {
   // some code...
   a = some_function<T1, T1, T1>(a, a);
   // some code...
}

Is it possible?

I know that I can use a struct with defined () operator. I'm just curious about functions.

EDIT:

While I was writing that question my friend found a partial solution:

template<typename T1, T1 (*some_function)(T1, T1)>
void big_fun(T1 a) {
   // some code...
   a = some_function(a, a);
   // some code...
}

But still - I'm curious if it's possible without a materialization of a function type before call. For example - I may want to call the passed template with various types combinations:

template<typename T1, typename T2, template<typename, typename, typename> some_function>
void big_fun(T1 a, T2 b) {
   // some code...
   a = some_function<T1, T1, T1>(a, a);
   a = some_function<T1, T2, T1>(a, b);
   b = some_function<T2, T2, T2>(b, b);
   b = some_function<T2, T1, T2>(b, a);
   // some code...
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

No, this is not possible. From 14.3.3 in N3337:

A template-argument for a template template-parameter shall be the name of a class template or an alias template, expressed as id-expression . When the template-argument names a class template, only primary class templates are considered when matching the template template argument with the corresponding parameter; partial specializations are not considered even if their parameter lists match that of the template template parameter.

The first paragraph only mentions class templates explicitly. I guess it's also not really worth the trouble given that you can do something very similar already with functions or a std::function as an argument.

share|improve this answer
1  
i don't understand a word of what you are saying.. -1, can you provide an ilustration for us that are not fluent in standarese? –  lurscher Feb 24 '12 at 17:58
    
@lurscher because you don't understand it is a horrible reason to downvote. I don't downvote quantum physicists when they talk about quantum physics because I don't understand it. –  Seth Carnegie Feb 24 '12 at 18:04
    
@SethCarnegie, i disagree. I think it is, by itself, a very good reason. besides, the answer is wrong too; what the question wants to do is completely possible, even in c++03. I think there is a disconnect between what the SO asks and what pmr answers, hence the downvote. If he improves his answer i'll be more than happy to withdraw it –  lurscher Feb 24 '12 at 18:19
    
@lurscher you said what the question wants to do is completely impossible, and the first sentence of this answer is "No, this is not possible." What's the disconnect? –  Seth Carnegie Feb 24 '12 at 18:29
    
@lursher, I will be very happy to read yours c++03 solution. What pmr wrote means to me that only a class template or its alias can be a template template argument (i.e. the argument of a template which is a template itself). –  Wojciech Żółtak Feb 24 '12 at 18:58

Templates in C++ are compiled during compile time using the concrete types. They have to be known.

This said you can go a bit further with your partial solution by passing a function template which arguments can be deduced. Note that this is no different then explicitly passing function with concrete types you just have to type less.

template<typename T>
T square(T a, T b)
{
    return a * b;
}

template<typename T, T (*some_function)(T, T)>
T test(T a) 
{
   return square (a, a);
}

void main()
{
    int a = test<int, square>(2);
    float b = test<float, square>(2.2f);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I don't really see a difference between that code and the "partial solution" code. The thing is that in this approach it's impossible to use some_function with various types without explicitely adding a new template argument. And I'm curious if there's a more flexible (but still without class usage) way. –  Wojciech Żółtak Feb 24 '12 at 18:51

As long as template< typename T1, typename T2, typename T3> someTemplate evaluates to some actual class without errors you can use it with as much combinations as you want, out and inside other templates.

Have you tried to compile it? Show us what error do you get (and concrete sample)

share|improve this answer
    
I know that I can use a class. I wrote that in my post. The question is about common functions. But according to what @pmr wrote - it seems syntactically impossible. –  Wojciech Żółtak Feb 24 '12 at 18:45
1  
The syntax the OP (and by extension you) use isn't valid. The correct one is template<typename T1> class someTemplate. Also nothing here is about evaluation. Imagine it this way: a template template argument can only be matched with the name of a class template having the same template parameter list (this is important for non-type template arguments). This template name is then injected into the other template and can be instantiated there. The problem is class template. I don't see a specific reason for this restriction, but I'm not on the committee and no language lawyer either. –  pmr Feb 24 '12 at 19:28
    
@pmr Uhm. Well. The syntax I used in an example was partially a pseudo-code i.e. I knew that I couldn't use a class keyword so I didn't used any. It was about the idea. –  Wojciech Żółtak Feb 25 '12 at 8:30

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