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What would be easiest method to split a string using c++11?

I've seen the method used by this post, but I feel that there ought to be a less verbose way of doing it using the new standard.

Edit: I would like to have a vector<string> as a result and be able to delimitate on a single character.

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1  
Splitting on spaces? And I don't think C++11 added anything here, think the accepted answer is still the best way. –  Mooing Duck Feb 24 '12 at 17:42
    
what do you want to after you split? print to cout? or get a vector of substrings? –  balki Feb 24 '12 at 17:42
    
Isn't this what Regular Expression parsing is for? –  Nicol Bolas Feb 24 '12 at 17:46

5 Answers 5

std::regex_token_iterator performs generic tokenization based on a regex. It may or may not be overkill for doing simple splitting on a single character, but it works and is not too verbose:

std::vector<std::string> split(const string& input, const string& regex) {
    // passing -1 as the submatch index parameter performs splitting
    std::sregex_token_iterator
        first{input.begin(), input.end(), regex, -1},
        last;
    return {first, last};
}
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10  
Great idea, super hard to read. –  deft_code Feb 24 '12 at 21:36
1  
Should mention that this is MSFT-specific. Doesn't exist on POSIX systems. –  jackyalcine Sep 6 at 20:11
    
Looks like it is also available in boost. –  phs Sep 6 at 20:57
    
regex_token_iterator is defined in C++11, but GCC doesn't support it natively until version 4.9 (see here). With earlier versions of GCC, you can use Boost regex. –  nobar Dec 5 at 22:30
    
A good regex initializer would be" +", for "one or more spaces". –  nobar Dec 5 at 23:30
#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>
#include <string>


using namespace std;

vector<string> split(const string& str, int delimiter(int) = ::isspace){
  vector<string> result;
  auto e=str.end();
  auto i=str.begin();
  while(i!=e){
    i=find_if_not(i,e, delimiter);
    if(i==e) break;
    auto j=find_if(i,e, delimiter);
    result.push_back(string(i,j));
    i=j;
  }
  return result;
}

int main(){
  string line;
  getline(cin,line);
  vector<string> result = split(line);
  for(auto s: result){
    cout<<s<<endl;
  }
}
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I don't know if this is less verbose, but it might be easier to grok for those more seasoned in dynamic languages such as javascript. The only C++11 feature it uses is lambdas.

#include <algorithm>
#include <string>
#include <cctype>
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

int main()
{
  using namespace std;
  string s = "hello  how    are you won't you tell me your name";
  vector<string> tokens;
  string token;

  for_each(s.begin(), s.end(), [&](char c) {
    if (!isspace(c))
        token += c;
    else 
    {
        if (token.length()) tokens.push_back(token);
        token.clear();
    }
  });
  if (token.length()) tokens.push_back(token);

  return 0;
}
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6  
why not for (auto const c : s) {...}? –  phresnel Apr 19 '12 at 12:19

My choice is boost::tokenizer, but i did't have any heavy tasks and test with huge data. Example from boost doc with lambda modification.

#include <iostream>
#include <boost/tokenizer.hpp>
#include <string>
#include <vector>

int main()
{
   using namespace std;
   using namespace boost;

   string s = "This is,  a test";
   vector<string> v;
   tokenizer<> tok(s);
   for_each (tok.begin(), tok.end(), [&v](const string & s) { v.push_back(s); } );
   // result 4 items: 1)This 2)is 3)a 4)test
   return 0;
}
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1  
why not a range based for? –  phresnel Apr 19 '12 at 12:19

Here is a (maybe less verbose) way to split string (based on the post you mentioned).

#include <string>
#include <sstream>
#include <vector>
std::vector<std::string> split(const std::string &s, char delim) {
  std::stringstream ss(s);
  std::string item;
  std::vector<std::string> elems;
  while (std::getline(ss, item, delim)) {
    elems.push_back(item);
  }
  return elems;
}
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