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I'm reading through a C code base, and I found a snippet that looks something like this:

void foo(int bar) {
    const int _bar = bar;
    ...
}

The author then uses _bar throughout the rest of the code. Why is this done? Is it an optimization, or is there some other reason?

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12  
I can't see any advantage over declaring the parameter const in the first place. –  Oliver Charlesworth Feb 24 '12 at 17:41
1  
@Oli: making non-pointer parameters const can be seen as leaking implementation details... –  Christoph Feb 24 '12 at 18:03
3  
@Christoph: It doesn't affect the outside world, though. You could declare your functions with non-const params in your public API, and then use const in the definition. (This is exactly what I do, in fact.) –  Oliver Charlesworth Feb 24 '12 at 18:08
    
@Oli: correct - in fact, I was just about to add that to my answer, but I needed to look up the relevant section of C99 first, which is the last, parenthesized sentence of a somewhat lengthy paragraph (which is the excuse I used when I found out that what I believed to be undefined behaviour is actually legal ;)) –  Christoph Feb 24 '12 at 18:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Presumably the author does this to avoid accidental assignment.

If the param is unchanged from the function input, the author could put the const in the param signature, as in void foo (int const bar) { ... }.

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But the author could just have declared the parameter const in the first place. –  Oliver Charlesworth Feb 24 '12 at 17:42
2  
Well, the code is in C, so references aren't available, unless I really don't understand C. If this is to avoid reassignment, why wouldn't the stub be "void foo(const int bar)"? –  user220878 Feb 24 '12 at 17:44
1  
Oh, right ahah. Removed the reference part in my post. –  Thomas Eding Feb 24 '12 at 17:45

The author then uses _bar throughout the rest of the code.

If _bar is used through out and not using the function parameter, I would qualify the function parameter by const.

void foo( const int bar )
{
     // use bar but modifications to bar itself are not allowed.
}
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As C passes arguments by value, there's no difference between

void foo(int bar);

and

void foo(const int bar);

as far as calling code is concerned.

Thus, const-qualifying a non-pointer parameter arguably makes an internal implementation detail part of the public API.

Another solution would be to declare the function without const in the header and only add it to the definition (as Oli Charlesworth suggests in the comments as well), ie

// in header file
extern void foo(int bar);

// in source file
void foo(const int bar)
{
    // ...
}

which is - as far as I know - legal due to the last sentence of C99 6.7.5.3 §15.

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You make some good points, but I disagree with "const-qualifying a non-pointer parameter arguably makes an internal implementation detail part of the public API." Why? Because of this: void foo (int const bar) { int baz = bar; /* use baz now */ } That is, the user has no way of knowing what is going on, even with a const param. –  Thomas Eding Feb 24 '12 at 18:25
1  
@trinithis: you're still leaking the information that for whatever reason, the argument needs to be const, which is additional information as the default for parameters is not to be const; you're correct that you can't derive from that how the parameter will be used, but that only strengthens the fact that the const qualification is useless as far as calling code is concerned... –  Christoph Feb 24 '12 at 18:37

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