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I've got an existing database full of objects (I'll use books as an example). When users login to a website I'd like to recommend books to them.

I can recommend books based on other people they follow etc but I'd like to be more accurate so I've collected a set of training data for each user.

The data is collected by repeatedly presenting each user with a book and asking them if they like the look of it or not.

The training data is stored in mongodb, the books are stored in a postgres database.

I've written code to predict wether or not a given user will like a given book based on their training data, but my question is this:

How should I apply the data / probability to query books in the postgres database?

Saving the probability a user likes a book for every user and every book would be inefficient.

Loading all of the books form the database and calculating the probability for each one would also be inefficient.

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You mention below that your algorithm is largely based on the naive Bayesian classifier, as covered in "Programming Collective Intelligence". Can you specify which pages from that book are most relevant? –  justis Feb 25 '12 at 4:15
    
Chapter 6 - Document filtering. Specifically the 'Filtering Blog Feeds' section. –  user210437 Feb 25 '12 at 12:26
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1 Answer

I've written code to predict wether or not a given user will like a given book based on their training data

What does this code look like? Ideally it's some kind of decision tree based on attributes of the book like genre, length, etc, and is technically called a classifier. A simple example:

if ( user.genres.contains(book.genre) ) {
    if ( user.maxLength < book.length ) {
        print "10% off, today only!"
    } 
}
print "how about some garden tools?"

Saving the probability a user likes a book for every user and every book would be inefficient.

True. Note that the above decision tree may be formulated as a database query:

SELECT * FROM Books WHERE Genre IN [user.genres] AND Length < [user.maxLength]

Which will give you all books that have the highest probability of being liked by the user, with respect to the training data.

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Thank you for your response. The code is using a naive bayesian classier, a lot of it was taken from the book "Programming Collective Intelligence". The training data is more complicated than genres. It consists of book 'features' and the number of times the user has liked or disliked a particular feature. The book rows in the database know nothing about the training data. The classifier calculates a probability based on a users training data and a given book, the data isn't 'stored'. –  user210437 Feb 24 '12 at 18:58
    
I assume that the Books table has columns corresponding to the features used in training: [user.genres] and [user.maxLength] are simply examples of possible training features. The database doesn't 'know' about them. You do, when you write the query. I'll post some suggestions given your note. –  paislee Feb 24 '12 at 19:40
    
Most of the features are not columns in the table. The features are based on words taken from the title and description, the category, author and other bit and pieces. The only real column I could use would be category. –  user210437 Feb 24 '12 at 20:06
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