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I have an application(say App1) which is connected to another application (App2) via .net remoting. App2 acts as a server.. If App2 goes down App1 will not be able to pull data from App2. We are planning to run an instance of App2(say App2a) in another machine so that if App2 goes down App1 automatically takes the data from App2a. When App2 runs again.. App1 will need to take the data from App2. The fail over mechanism is not implemented yet... Please suggest a design pattern so that in future any number of server instances can be added for App1 to pull data.

Thanks

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Failover, replication, log shipping... not sure if they are "design" patterns they are more concepts. –  Nix Feb 24 '12 at 18:52
    
We cannot answer this question without knowing anything about how the clients communicate with app1. –  Chris Shain Feb 24 '12 at 18:54
2  
What you are looking for is a load balancer which will keep the load of tasks balanced and at the same time detect if a server is down and redirect Client (App1) to Server[n] (App2). –  Alex Mendez Feb 24 '12 at 18:58
1  
Remoting is pretty obsolete. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/72x4h507%28VS.85%29.aspx –  David Lively Feb 24 '12 at 19:10
1  
One implication of the fact that Remoting is obsolete is that you won't find many people creating solutions for Remoting problems. –  John Saunders Feb 24 '12 at 19:15

1 Answer 1

The closest design pattern that I can think of is the Chain of Responsibility pattern.

The idea is that:

  1. You build a chain of objects (servers)
  2. Let the object (server) handle the request
  3. If it is unable to do so, pass the request down the chain

Code:

// Server interface
public interface IServer
{
    object FetchData(object param);
}

public class ServerProxyBase: IServer
{
    // Successor.
    // Alternate server to contact if the current instance fails.
    public ServerBase AlternateServerProxy { get; set; }

    // Interface
    public virtual object FetchData(object param)
    {
        if (AlternateServerProxy != null)
        {
            return AlternateServerProxy.FetchData(param);
        }
        throw new NotImplementedException("Unable to recover");
    }
}

// Server implementation
public class ServerProxy : ServerProxyBase
{
    // Interface implementation
    public override object FetchData(object param)
    {
        try
        {
            // Contact actual server and return data
            // Remoting/WCF code in here...
        }
        catch
        {
            // If fail to contact server, 
            // run base method (attempt to recover)
            return base.FetchData(param);
        }
    }
}

public class Client
{
    private IServer _serverProxy;
    public Client()
    {
        // Wire up main server, and its failover/retry servers
        _serverProxy = new ServerProxy("mainserver:2712")
        {
            AlternateServerProxy = new ServerProxy("failover1:2712")
            {
                AlternateServerProxy = new ServerProxy("failover2:2712")
            }
        };
    }
}

This example wires up a chain of 3 servers (mainserver, failover1, failover2).

The call the FetchData() will always attempt to go to mainserver.

When it fails, it'll then attempt failover1, followed by failover2, before finally throwing an exception.

If it were up to me, I wouldn't mind using something quick and dirty such as:

public class FailoverServerProxy: IServer
{
    private readonly List<ServerProxy> _servers;
    public FailoverServerProxy RegisterServer(Server server)
    {
        _servers.Add(server);
        return this;
    }

    // Implement interface
    public object FetchData(object param)
    {
        foreach(var server in _servers)
        {
            try
            {
                return server.FetchData(param);
            }
            catch
            {
                // Failed. Continue to next server in list
                continue;
            }
        }

        // No more servers to try. No longer able to recover
        throw new Exception("Unable to fetch data");
    }    
}

public class Client
{
    private IServer _serverProxy;
    public Client()
    {
        // Wire up main server, and its failover/retry servers
        _serverProxy = new FailoverServerProxy()
                            .RegisterServer("mainserver:2712")
                            .RegisterServer("failover1:2712")
                            .RegisterServer("failover2:2712");        
    }

}

I think it borrows ideas from other patterns such as Facade, Strategy and Proxy.

But my motivations are simply to:

  1. Make the least impact on existing classes (ie, No extra property in the Server class)
  2. Separation of concerns:
    • Central class for the server's failover/recovery logic.
    • Keep the failover/recovery's implementation hidden from the Client/Server.
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