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I have the following base class (code shortened):

class SignupForm(GroupForm):

    username = forms.CharField(
        label = _("Username"),
        max_length = 30,
        widget = forms.TextInput()
    )

    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        super(SignupForm, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
        if REQUIRED_EMAIL or EMAIL_VERIFICATION or EMAIL_AUTHENTICATION:
            self.fields["email"].label = ugettext("Email")
            self.fields["email"].required = True
        else:
            self.fields["email"].label = ugettext("Email (optional)")
            self.fields["email"].required = False


    def after_signup(self, user, **kwargs):
        """
        An extension point for subclasses.
        """
        pass

What I wanna do is override the after_signup() function and the username field like so:

class CompanySignupForm(SignupForm):
    #TODO: override fields for company signup form

    username = forms.CharField(
        label = _("Username TEST"),
        max_length = 30,
        widget = forms.TextInput()
    )

    def after_signup(self, user, **kwargs):
        """
        An extension point for subclasses.
        """
        print str('after_signup is has been overwritten')

My Problem: Only the username field shows the desired behavior. The after_signup() function get never called. Instead the after_signup() function of the base class SignupForm gets called. What am I doning wrong?

EDIT:

the imports: 
from django import forms 
from django.contrib.auth.models import User 
from django.utils.translation import ugettext_lazy as _, ugettext

instantiating CompanySignupForm:

url(r"^signup/$", CompanySignupForm.as_view(), name="acct_signup")

after_signup() is beeing called from a function in the base class:

def save(self, request=None): 
    # more code here
    # ...
    self.after_signup(new_user)
share|improve this question
1  
Could you show us how you are instantiating CompanySignupForm and calling after_signup()? –  NPE Feb 24 '12 at 18:58
    
Please show your imports. –  Daenyth Feb 24 '12 at 19:12
    
the imports are fine i get no errors. but here they are: from django import forms from django.contrib.auth.models import User from django.utils.translation import ugettext_lazy as _, ugettext –  j7nn7k Feb 24 '12 at 19:19
    
instantiating CompanySignupForm: url(r"^signup/$", CompanySignupForm.as_view(), name="acct_signup") –  j7nn7k Feb 24 '12 at 19:21
    
after_signup() is beeing called from a function in the base class: def save(self, request=None): self.after_signup(new_user) –  j7nn7k Feb 24 '12 at 19:22

1 Answer 1

Use isinstance() to check an instance’s type and .__class__ to make sure you are instantiating CompanySignupForm.

Also you might want to create an __init__ method on the CompanySignupForm to ensure it's not just instantiating the super class.

Note: Reading your edit more closely your not calling after_signup directly the base class function save is right? This will then call it's local method after_signup if it exists. I'd take that function out of the base class and force it to call the inherited functions

To check the version run:

signup = CompanySignupForm.as_view()
print signup.__class__

url(r"^signup/$", signup, name="acct_signup")
share|improve this answer
    
could you show me a specific example using my code? –  j7nn7k Feb 24 '12 at 20:09
    
Added code to check class can you include the GroupForm code, or the code that has as_view() and save() these are calling the GroupForm after_signup() function I think as they are base level functions. –  Matt Alcock Feb 24 '12 at 20:14
    
Also please up vote if this helps? –  Matt Alcock Feb 24 '12 at 20:14

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