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Lets say I have a1 and a2:

a1 = [1,2,3]
a2 = [4,2,5]

To see if a1 shares any elements with a2, I can loop over each and compare each element:

def intersect?(x,y)
  a1.each do |x|
    a2.each do |y|
      if x == y return true
    end
  end
  false
end

But even easier, (a1.to_set & a2.to_set).present? gives me the same answer.

I'm assuming that the set operation is quicker and more efficient? If this is true, is it still true taking into account to overhead (if any) of the .to_set operation on each array?

tia

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why are you converting it into to_set . You can straight away use a1 & a2 and will return an array with all the common elements between the 2 arrays –  Raghu Feb 24 '12 at 19:22
    
but does using the & operator against the arrays convert it to a set, or just effectively do the each loop across each array? if the first, its just as inefficient (and slow) as the each loop. –  Geremy Feb 24 '12 at 19:31
    
The & method of Array is implemented in C. –  steenslag Feb 24 '12 at 20:48
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Surprisingly the & method of Array is faster than that of Set for quite large collections:

require 'set'
require 'benchmark'
f = 10_000
ar1 = (1..(10*f)).to_a # 100_000 elements
ar2 = ((5*f)..(15*f)).to_a # also 100_000 elements
set1 = ar1.to_set
set2 = ar2.to_set
n = 10

Benchmark.bm(10) do |testcase|
  testcase.report('Array'){ n.times{ ar1 & ar2 } }
  testcase.report('Set'){ n.times{ set1 & set2 } }
end

Result:

                 user     system      total        real
Array        1.380000   0.030000   1.410000 (  1.414634)
Set          2.310000   0.020000   2.330000 (  2.359317)
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This is very cool, thanks steenslag! –  Geremy Feb 24 '12 at 22:26
    
See my update below. stackoverflow.com/a/10456395/1074296 Used properly, set's are indeed faster than arrays. –  dbenhur May 5 '12 at 20:04
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steenslag's answer had an interesting observation that array & array was faster that set & set. It looks like most of that penalty appears to be the expense of obtaining keys from the underlying hash of the first set to enumerate on. A hybrid approach using the array for the left side of the operation and set for the right hand is faster yet. If you only want to know if there's any intersection, the same approach with #any? is even quicker:

#!/usr/bin/env ruby

require 'set'
require 'benchmark'

f = 10_000
ar1 = (1..(10*f)).to_a # 100_000 elements
ar2 = ((5*f)..(15*f)).to_a # also 100_000 elements
set1 = ar1.to_set
set2 = ar2.to_set
n = 10

Benchmark.bm(10) do |testcase|
  testcase.report('Array'){ n.times{ ar1 & ar2 } }
  testcase.report('Set'){ n.times{ set1 & set2 } }
  testcase.report('Set2'){ n.times{ ar1.select{ |element| set2.include? element } } }
  testcase.report('Set2present'){ n.times{ ar1.any?{ |element| set2.include? element } } }
end


$ ruby -v => ruby 1.9.2p290 (2011-07-09 revision 32553) [x86_64-darwin10.8.0]

                user     system      total        real
Array       0.680000   0.030000   0.710000 (  0.720882)
Set         1.130000   0.020000   1.150000 (  1.150571)
Set2        0.430000   0.000000   0.430000 (  0.434957)
Set2present  0.210000   0.010000   0.220000 (  0.220990)
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1  
"the expense of obtaining keys from the underlying hash of the first set to enumerate on." Argument against this: set1 & ar2 is faster then the set1 & set2 version. I think Set is slower then expected because it's implemented in Ruby - too much Ruby before you get to the hash. Interesting research, +1. –  steenslag May 5 '12 at 20:38
    
Yeah, I was making a guess rather than looking at code. Set is implemented as a thin ruby veneer over the c-implemented Hash. The perf sink appears to be the implementation of Set#& github.com/ruby/ruby/blob/trunk/lib/set.rb#L338 which enumerates over the right arg and #adds to a new set if it's included in the left arg instead of using c-implemented select which would avoid some extra bookkeeping and ruby level method dispatch github.com/ruby/ruby/blob/trunk/hash.c#L1004 github.com/ruby/ruby/blob/trunk/hash.c#L194 –  dbenhur May 7 '12 at 23:16
    
I wish I could upvote this twice! The optimisation which uses array on left, set on right and the any? method is awesome. It's worth pointing out that for smaller sets the results will flip around (faster to use sets than arrays) so if you really care it's always worth doing some optimisation based on your actual data set –  Jamie Cook Jun 3 '13 at 6:09
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It should be faster for large arrays. Your method runs in O(m*n) time because it has to loop over both arrays. For tables of 3 elements each this is basically negligible, but for larger tables it can be very expensive.

The second method will use hash lookups which are much faster, but first the arrays have to be put in sets.

What you should do is try both methods using arrays of sizes you expect to see in your application and see which is faster. If they're about the same size you can just pick whichever one you think is clearer.

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I just want to elaborate upon the excellent answers by steenslag and dbenhur. Specifically, I wanted to know if SortedSet would perform any better. It actually surprised me initially that the Ruby Set type was not implemented as a sorted set, since I come from C++; the STL by default uses an ordered set, and you generally have to specify unordered_set if you don't want ordering.

I also wanted to know if the size of the set made a difference, as suggested in some other answers.

require 'set'
require 'benchmark'

f = 20 # 10_000
ar1 = (1..(10*f)).to_a # 100_000 elements
ar2 = ((5*f)..(15*f)).to_a # also 100_000 elements
set1 = ar1.to_set
set2 = ar2.to_set
sset1 = SortedSet.new(ar1)
sset2 = SortedSet.new(ar2)
n = 20000 # 10

Benchmark.bm(10) do |testcase|
  testcase.report('Array'){ n.times{ ar1 & ar2 } }
  testcase.report('Set'){ n.times{ set1 & set2 } }
  testcase.report('SortedSet') { n.times{ sset1 & sset2 } }
  testcase.report('Set2'){ n.times{ ar1.select{ |element| set2.include? element } } }
  testcase.report('Set2present'){ n.times{ ar1.any?{ |element| set2.include? element } } }

  testcase.report('SortedSet2'){ n.times{ ar1.select{ |element| sset2.include? element } } }
  testcase.report('SortedSet2present'){ n.times{ ar1.any?{ |element| sset2.include? element } } }
end

Here are the results for f=20; n=20000:

$ ruby set.rb
                 user     system      total        real
Array        1.950000   0.010000   1.960000 (  1.963030)
Set          3.330000   0.040000   3.370000 (  3.374105)
SortedSet    3.810000   0.040000   3.850000 (  3.860340)
Set2         1.410000   0.010000   1.420000 (  1.427221)
Set2present  0.760000   0.000000   0.760000 (  0.759447)
SortedSet2   1.420000   0.000000   1.420000 (  1.446559)
SortedSet2present  0.770000   0.010000   0.780000 (  0.770939)

And here are the results for f=10000; n=10:

$ ruby set.rb
                 user     system      total        real
Array        0.910000   0.020000   0.930000 (  0.939325)
Set          1.270000   0.010000   1.280000 (  1.293581)
SortedSet    1.220000   0.010000   1.230000 (  1.229650)
Set2         0.550000   0.000000   0.550000 (  0.552708)
Set2present  0.290000   0.010000   0.300000 (  0.291845)
SortedSet2   0.550000   0.000000   0.550000 (  0.561049)
SortedSet2present  0.330000   0.000000   0.330000 (  0.339950)

So, for large sets, looks like Set does better than SortedSet; and for smaller sets, SortedSet does better than Set. When using the & notation, Array is faster than either. Looks like SortedSet2present performs significantly more efficiently with large sets, whereas Set2present performs more efficiently with small sets.

Whereas Set is implemented using Hash, SortedSet is an RBTree (implemented in C). In both cases, & is implemented in Ruby rather than C.

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Just a quick note: I re-read the sources for Set and SortedSet and apparently SortedSet only makes use of an RBTree if the call to require 'rbtree' doesn't result in a LoadError. Otherwise it falls back to whatever Set uses. So that may have adversely affected my benchmarks, since I didn't at that time have rbtree installed. I tried re-running it with rbtree already required, and saw no significant difference, but I'm unsure if my Ruby install is properly loading it. –  mohawkjohn Jun 26 '13 at 21:21
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The truth is with arrays this small, they either will be essentially the same or the lists will be faster than the sets.

A decent set implementation will do set operations faster than you can do list operations BUT there's some overhead. If you want to know what your implementation will do, use big sets/lists and test.

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in microbenchmarks, I've observed that Set#include? is always faster than Array#include? even for cardinality == 1. This advantage doesn't always translate to the union and intersection operations due to the Set implementation's enumerator choices. –  dbenhur May 7 '12 at 23:21
    
I voted this down because it's actually contrary to benchmarks. –  mohawkjohn Jun 6 '13 at 19:50
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