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I have a class that is a super-class to many other classes. I would like to know (in the init() of my super-class if the subclass has overridden a specific method.

I tried to accomplish this with a class method, but the results were wrong:

class Super:
   def __init__(self):
      if self.method == Super.method:
         print 'same'
      else:
         print 'different'

   @classmethod
   def method(cls):
      pass

class Sub1(Super):
   def method(self):
      print 'hi'

class Sub2(Super):
   pass

Super() # should be same
Sub1() # should be different
Sub2() # should be same

>>> same
>>> different
>>> different

Is there any way for a super-class to know if a sub-class has overridden a method?

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1  
Could you say a few words about why you'd want to do that? –  NPE Feb 24 '12 at 19:21
    
Nothing comes to mind immediately, but if you include docstrings for your methods, then they get overwritten when the method is overridden. You should therefore be able to track it with MyClass.methodname.__doc__. But I find this solution to be very hack, which is why I'm not posting it as an answer –  inspectorG4dget Feb 24 '12 at 19:21
    
Basically I want to have the super-class have these methods defined as just 'pass' and have a separate method (actually init) call these functions. I would like to have init put in print statements that say we are starting or ending the function, but if that function is still null, these statements look out of place, and I would like to do away with them. –  Brian Feb 24 '12 at 19:52
2  
@Brian Why not make these print statements part of the methods in the subclass instead of in the superclass? –  katrielalex Feb 24 '12 at 20:04
    
Part of the goal of the super-class is to remove the need to add these common items to the sub-classes. There is one super-class, and many sub-classes. –  Brian Feb 24 '12 at 22:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can use your own decorator. But this is a trick and will only work on classes where you control the implementation.

def override(method):
  method.is_overridden = True
  return method

class Super:
   def __init__(self):
      if hasattr(self.method, 'is_overridden'):
         print 'different'
      else:
         print 'same'
   @classmethod
   def method(cls):
      pass

class Sub1(Super):
   @override
   def method(self):
      print 'hi'

class Sub2(Super):
   pass

Super() # should be same
Sub1() # should be different
Sub2() # should be same

>>> same
>>> different
>>> same
share|improve this answer
    
I went in just a slightly different direction, decorating my method with @native, and assuming the sub-classes will not. I think I'll do it this way since I don't have much control over the sub-classes. It works well, thank you for your help! –  Brian Feb 24 '12 at 20:46

You can compare whatever is in the class's __dict__ with the function inside the method you can retrieve from the object - the "detect_overriden" functionbellow does that - the trick is to pass the "parent class" for its name, just as one does in a call to "super" - else it is not easy to retrieve attributes from the parentclass itself instead of those of the subclass:

# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-
from types import FunctionType

def detect_overriden(cls, obj):
    res = []
    for key, value in cls.__dict__.items():
        if isinstance(value, classmethod):
            value = getattr(cls, key).im_func
        if isinstance(value, (FunctionType, classmethod)):
            meth = getattr(obj, key)
            if not meth.im_func is  value:
                res.append(key)
    return res


# Test and example
class A(object):
    def  __init__(self):
        print detect_overriden(A, self)

    def a(self): pass
    @classmethod
    def b(self): pass
    def c(self): pass

class B(A):
    def a(self): pass
    #@classmethod
    def b(self): pass

edit changed code to work fine with classmethods as well: if it detects a classmethod on the parent class, extracts the underlying function before proceeding.

-- Another way of doing this, without having to hard code the class name, would be to follow the instance's class ( self.__class__) method resolution order (given by the __mro__ attribute) and search for duplicates of the methods and attributes defined in each class along the inheritance chain.

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It seems simplest and sufficient to do this by comparing the common subset of the dictionaries of an instance and the base class itself, e.g.:

def detect_overridden(cls, obj):
  common = cls.__dict__.keys() & obj.__class__.__dict__.keys()
  diff = [m for m in common if cls.__dict__[m] != obj.__class__.__dict__[m]]
  print(diff)

def f1(self):
  pass

class Foo:
  def __init__(self):
    detect_overridden(Foo, self)
  def method1(self):
    print("Hello foo")
  method2=f1

class Bar(Foo):
  def method1(self):
    print("Hello bar")
  method2=f1 # This is pointless but not an override
#  def method2(self):
#    pass

b=Bar()
f=Foo()

Runs and gives:

['method1']
[]
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