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I have programmed a punch clock system. I need to modify it to comply with California overtime rules such that if someone works more than 8 hours in 24, they receive overtime. I am stumped on how to go about doing this that is not computationally intensive.

Our punches are rounded to 15 minute intervals, meaning people will punch in at 8:00 AM, 8:15 AM, 8:30 AM and so on.

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In what format are you currently storing the data? –  Joachim Isaksson Feb 24 '12 at 19:46
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Are you sure it's calculated on a rolling basis? A quick Google suggests the Californian overtime rules relate to working 8 hours in the same day, resetting at midnight. –  Matthew Strawbridge Feb 24 '12 at 20:42

1 Answer 1

So if someone starts at 8am on Monday, works a total of 8 hours, and starts at 7am on Tuesday, they get an hour of overtime?

Assume you have a list of start/stop date time pairs for a given employee. This list has to include start/stop date time pairs from the previous time period.

  1. Get the first start/stop date time pair from the current pay period.
  2. Get the previous start/stop date time pair.
  3. Determine the interval in hours and fractions of hours between the previous start and the current start.
  4. If the interval is greater than or equal to 24, get the next current pay period start/stop date time pair, and go to 2. Exit if no more start/stop date time pairs.
  5. Else, if the interval is less than 24, calculate the overtime in the current start/stop date time pair. The lessor of (24 - interval) and the amount of hours worked in the current start/stop date time pair.
  6. Get the next current pay period start/stop date time pair. Exit if no more start/stop date time pairs.
  7. Hold the previous start/stop date time pair.
  8. Go to 3.
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