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I have the javascript code for a link click:

 document.getElementById('giddy').onclick = function {
        alert(this.href);
    };

and I want to separate the function part of it...I have

 document.getElementById('giddy').onclick = poro(this);
    function poro(yyyy) {
        alert(yyyy.href);
    };

But it is not working (says undefined in the alert)...what am I doing wrong?

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Your not assigning the onclick event handler to a function, you are calling the function poro and passing this which at this point is not a hyperlink object. –  asawyer Feb 24 '12 at 19:49

7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You don't need to pass this as a parameter. this will be the context for the function when it is called. You should just have:

document.getElementById('giddy').onclick = poro;
function poro() {
    alert(this.href);
};
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This works?!!? how does javascript know that poro is a function if it does not have ()? –  David19801 Feb 24 '12 at 20:01
1  
in JS, () executes the function. Functions can be passed around as variables by referencing it without its (). –  Mathletics Feb 24 '12 at 20:04
    
function poro() { ... } is equivalent to var poro = function() { ... }, which is why this works. –  Dave Feb 24 '12 at 20:46
    
@Dave this being Stack Overflow, that's wrong. They both allow you to pass poro around, but the former declares a named function while the latter assigns an anonymous function to a variable. –  Mathletics Feb 24 '12 at 20:51
    
Okay, I stand corrected. Thanks. –  Dave Feb 24 '12 at 20:56

Get rid of (this) and use this in the function instead of yyyy.

document.getElementById('giddy').onclick = poro;
function poro() {
    alert(this.href);
};
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You're immediately calling the poro function. Essentially, you're telling Javascript that the element's onclick value will equal the result of calling the poro(this [window] ) function.

To get around this, you can wrap the poro(this) function inside an empty function, like so:

document.getElementById('giddy').onclick = function(){poro(this)} function poro(yyyy) { alert(yyyy.href); };

You may also want to consider using an eventListener, as it allows room for expansion.

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Almost there! You should do:

document.getElementById('giddy').onclick = function(){ poro(this); }
function poro(yyyy) {
    alert(yyyy.href);
};

Note poro(this); wrapped in an anonymous function.

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I always forget that they're called anonymous functions... not sure why. –  Jeffrey Sweeney Feb 24 '12 at 19:51
2  
Why would you create an anonymous function for this? This completely ignores one of the major benefits of JavaScript (functions can be passed as variables.) –  Mathletics Feb 24 '12 at 20:05
    
Agreed, better solution. –  Rémi Breton Feb 24 '12 at 20:12

I'd recommend using addEventListener instead of the onclick method.

Try this:

var giddy = document.getElementById('giddy');
giddy.addEventListener('click', function(e) { poro(this); }, false);
function poro(yyyy) {
  alert(yyyy.href);
}
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why addeventlistener and not onclick? is it better? –  David19801 Feb 24 '12 at 19:57
    
Please see this page for more info: developer.mozilla.org/en/DOM/element.onclick "Only one onclick handler can be assigned to an object at a time with this property. You may be inclined to use the addEventListener method instead, since it is more flexible and part of the DOM Events specification." –  Nick Beranek Feb 24 '12 at 19:59

since you are using jquery use :

$('#giddy').click(function(){ poro($(this));});

or you can use the bind() function

$("#giddy").bind("click", $(this), poro);
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this isn't defined when you call it.

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The point is getting that poro function fired, after that getting this is easy. –  Rémi Breton Feb 24 '12 at 19:53
1  
Actually, this will equal the window object in that context. The problem is that the function is immediately being executed. –  Jeffrey Sweeney Feb 24 '12 at 19:53
    
Oh I see, I guess what I really meant was that this wouldn't be the link. Like you said, it would be the window. –  rcplusplus Feb 24 '12 at 21:19

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