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Given a text file named file like this:

AAA 3/4 2/2 3/5 
BBB 3/4 2/3 3/3 6/7 
CCC 4/4 7/9

What should I do to get just the numerator of each fraction? like following:

AAA 3 2 2
BBB 3 2 3 6
CCC 4 7

Thank you.

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When you tried this solving this for yourself, with which part did you get stuck? –  Johnsyweb Feb 24 '12 at 20:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted
$> cat text
AAA 3/4 2/2 3/5 
BBB 3/4 2/3 3/3 6/7 
CCC 4/4 7/9

Idea is to match any fraction and get only numerator from each one. So, fraction is (numbers)/(numbers) . Using groups it's easy to get what you want.

$> sed -r -e 's/([0-9]*)\/([0-9]*)/\1/g' ./text
AAA 3 2 3 
BBB 3 2 3 6 
CCC 4 7
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Why not just sed 's!/[0-9]\{1,\}!!g' text? –  Johnsyweb Feb 24 '12 at 20:24
    
Just for readability. I'm not sure that OP is really familiar with sed. –  ДМИТРИЙ МАЛИКОВ Feb 24 '12 at 20:26
    
Thanks for your help. This one is indeed readable. –  user1224398 Feb 24 '12 at 22:01
    
@Johnsyweb Thanks for replying. Actually I'm not familiar with sed, but I'll try to figure this one out.. –  user1224398 Feb 24 '12 at 22:03
    
@ДМИТРИЙ МАЛИКОВ Why didn't you put backslashes before parentheses? Like sed -r -e 's/\([0-9]*\)\/\([0-9]*\)/\1/g' ./text –  user1224398 Feb 25 '12 at 0:47

This might work for you:

sed 's/\/[0-9]*//g' file
AAA 3 2 3 
BBB 3 2 3 6 
CCC 4 7
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Thanks for replying. This does work, but I don't quite understand the code. Could you explain a little bit? –  user1224398 Feb 27 '12 at 18:43
    
This looks for multiples (the g flag) of a forward slash \/ (which needs to quoted with a backward slash) followed by zero or more digits. [0-9]* and replaces them with nothing // –  potong Feb 27 '12 at 20:35
    
oh..got it..excellent touch..Thanks again. –  user1224398 Feb 27 '12 at 20:41

Try using awk, sed or a lex program.

Edit: Removing UUOC as per comments.

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2  
That would be a UUOC! –  Johnsyweb Feb 24 '12 at 20:20
1  
Hah! Never saw that acronym before. Fair point though... –  smessing Feb 24 '12 at 20:24
1  
STOP PIPING CATS! –  ДМИТРИЙ МАЛИКОВ Feb 24 '12 at 20:29

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