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I am parsing a binary log file. The log file is formatted as follows: every 10 bytes is a record, the first byte of the record is the record type, the next 5 bytes are a timestamp and the last 4 bytes are record type specific data.

Currently I am doing the following:

# read the input binary stream
with open(filename, mode='rb') as trace_stream:
    # create an empty list of trace records
    trace = []
    # iterate over each record in the binary stream
    for record_type, record_data in yield_record(trace_stream,
                                                 size=RECORD_LENGTH):
        # create a new record instance
        if record_type == SEN_RECORD:
            new_record = sen_record(record_data)
        elif record_type == DSP_RECORD:
            new_record = dsp_record(record_data)
        elif record_type == USO_RECORD:
            new_record = uso_record(record_data)
        elif record_type == SDM_RECORD:
            new_record = sdm_record(record_data)
        elif record_type == DOC_RECORD:
            new_record = doc_record(record_data)
        elif record_type == DAT_RECORD:
            new_record = dat_record(record_data)
        elif record_type == LAT_RECORD:
            new_record = lat_record(record_data)
        elif record_type == SWI_RECORD:
            new_record = swi_record(record_data)
        elif record_type == FTL_RECORD:
            new_record = ftl_record(record_data)

        # append this new record to our trace
        trace.append(new_record)

Where sen_record, dsp_record, uso_record etc. are all sub-classes of a generic record class

What I would like to do is the following:

# read the input binary stream
with open(filename, mode='rb') as trace_stream:
    # create an empty list of trace records
    trace = []
    # iterate over each record in the binary stream
    for record_type, record_data in yield_record(trace_stream,
                                                 size=RECORD_LENGTH):
            new_record = record(record_data)

    trace.append(new_record)

And then have the record class constructor do the work of determining what type of record it is and creating the appropriate class instances. Ideally my "main" routine shouldn't need to know about the record types?

Is there any way to do this?

share|improve this question
    
You might be able to override the record's __new__ method to return an instance of a subclass. –  Darthfett Feb 24 '12 at 20:25
    
Have you come across Python's struct module to handle unpacking binary data, by the way? –  katrielalex Feb 24 '12 at 20:28
    
@katrielalex I am using the struct module inside the constructors of each record sub class, since each record type interprets its data differently. –  ACRL Feb 24 '12 at 20:42

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It would be simpler just to store the mapping

record_types = {SEN_RECORD: sen_record,
                DSP_RECORD: dsp_record,
                USO_RECORD: uso_record,
                SDM_RECORD: sdm_record,
                DOC_RECORD: doc_record,
                DAT_RECORD: dat_record,
                LAT_RECORD: lat_record,
                SWI_RECORD: swi_record,
                FTL_RECORD: ftl_record}

somewhere, and use that to look up the correct record type. (Note that you can do this, because classes are just objects, so you can put them in a dictionary.)

Specifically, you'd do

new_record = record_types[record_type](record_data)

There are more complicated ways of doing this (say if you wanted the subclasses to be created dynamically and automatically registered with their superclass upon creation), but there's no need to employ them in your situation.

share|improve this answer
1  
I like this. Not perfect but much cleaner than what I had. –  ACRL Feb 24 '12 at 20:43
    
"Not perfect"??!! The alternative is to implement __new__ in some base class, and then contaminate the base class with knowledge of its subclasses so it know which type to instantiate. In Python terms, I don't know of a righter answer. –  Paul McGuire Feb 25 '12 at 3:11
    
Since you say your constants SEN_RECORD etc. are integers 0 to 10, the record_types can be a simple array instead of a dictionary, with no other code change. Of course, that means you may have to change record_types if you change the constants. –  wberry Feb 28 '12 at 16:40

There is a way to do this but I don't recommend you use it. I recommend simply using a factory function to construct and return the correct type of object based on the record.

def create_record(record_type):
  if record_type == SEN_RECORD:
    return sen_record(record_data)
  ...

To override the behavior of object creation, you can provide a __new__ method in the class. See the official docs for details. But again, I do not recommend this; for all but the most specialized applications, using this is playing with fire.

share|improve this answer

Since it's nice to learn about the dynamic features of Python, here's how you can do this 'magically'. It's not a great idea to do this sort of thing in real code though -- it's fragile and can lead to unexpected behaviour. It's also putting data in your variable names, which is a bad habit.

Also, you can't quite do what you want, because there's an issue with the sequence of operations. Specifically, when you define Record you can't have defined its subclasses yet (obviously). So you can't at that point put the dispatching logic into the class. But there's no other distinguished time at which you can say "now we've finished defining subclasses, set up the dispatch", so you have to hard-code it into your source code after all the subclass definitions. Then you might as well hard-code the dict as in my other answer.

Anyway, with that disclaimer, here's the magic. (It only works for new-style classes.)

@classmethod
def update_record_types(cls):
    cls.records = {c.__name__.upper(): c for c in cls.__subclasses__()}

Then Record.__init__ just refers to the class attribute records, which you can update at any time by calling Record.update_record_types().


EDIT: I guess I should point out how to use this!

>>> class Record(object):
...     @classmethod
...     def update_record_types(cls):
...         cls.records = {c.__name__.upper(): c for c in cls.__subclasses__()}
... 
>>> # define some record types, each with their own __init__
>>> class sen_record(Record): pass
>>> class dsp_record(Record): pass
>>> class uso_record(Record): pass
>>>
>>> # update the listing of record types
>>> Record.update_record_types()
>>>
>>> # look up the one you want
>>> Record.records["SEN_RECORD"]
<class '__main__.sen_record'>
share|improve this answer
    
This is kitschy and fun as a learning exercise. +1 –  wberry Feb 27 '12 at 16:06

Here's a way to do it using eval. I have to make an assumption about your data though, that your record_type field is one of the values "SEN", "DSP", etc. I'm also going to assume that your parser does validation of the data, otherwise this code would be a huge security hole. (As it is, there is a performance penalty for doing this (versus a dictionary or factory function), but it is sort of "magical" as you desire.)

class SEN_record(record):
  ...

class DSP_record(record):
  ...

... # other record subclasses similarly defined here

# read the input binary stream
with open(filename, mode='rb') as trace_stream:
    # create an empty list of trace records
    trace = []
    # iterate over each record in the binary stream
    for record_type, record_data in yield_record(trace_stream,
                                                 size=RECORD_LENGTH):
        trace.append(eval("%s_record(record_data)" % (record_type,)))
share|improve this answer
    
(Slightly) less of a gaping security hole would be to look up the class in globals(). –  katrielalex Feb 27 '12 at 19:36
    
Slick, however record_type is an integer between 0 and 10. So I would still have to have a look up to get the appropriate string. Nevertheless cool. –  ACRL Feb 28 '12 at 13:30

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