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I tried to make a program that gets a user input(lines) and prints the longest line that is over 80 characters long. I made the program , but when i ran it , it outputed some very weird symbols. Could you please tell me what might be wrong with my code ?

#include <stdio.h>
#define MINLINE 80
#define MAXLINE 1000

int getline(char current[]);
void copy(char from[], char to[]);

int main(void)
{
    int len; // current input line lenght
    int max; // the lenght of a longest line that's over 80 characters
    char current[MAXLINE]; // current input line
    char over80[MAXLINE]; // input line that's over 80 characters long

    while (len = (getline(current)) > 0) {
        if (len > MINLINE) {
            max = len;
            copy(current, over80);
        }
    }

    if (max > 0) {
        printf("%s", over80);
    }
    else {
        printf("No input line was over 80 characters long");
    }

    return 0;
}

int getline(char current[]) {
    int i = 0, c;
    while (((c = getchar()) != EOF) && c != '\n') {
        current[i] = c;
        ++i;
    }

    if (i == '\n') {
        current[i] = c;
        ++i;
    }

    current[i] = '\0';

    return i;
}

void copy(char from[], char to[]) {
    int i = 0;
    while ((to[i] = from[i]) != '\0') {
        ++i;
    }
}

Thank you very much for your help !

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2  
You should probably tag this as homework. –  Sean Bright Feb 24 '12 at 21:12
4  
I count at least 5 errors identified below. Well done SO! –  David Heffernan Feb 24 '12 at 21:28
2  
getline() can cause buffer overflows (even though you have a huge buffer) and copy() should be replaced with strcpy from string.h. The while condition in main is also severely broken (see schnaader's answer). Also, if (len > MINLINE) doesn't mean that len > max, so why are you doing max = len; if that's the case? If this condition isn't true (which it never will be because len can only be 1 or 0) then max and over80 will be uninitialised, and they'll both contain garbage. There are quite a few errors there, you should turn up your compiler warnings for a start. –  AusCBloke Feb 24 '12 at 21:29
    
I feel quite embarassed , sorry for such a buggy code :d . I think i was just quite tired after a while , because it took me about 2 hours to come up with a solution to my simple problem and when i thought i finally had finished it, and it didn't run, i was just so frustrated i couldn't calmly overlook my code :d . (needless to say, im a beginner .d ) –  geekkid Feb 24 '12 at 21:59
    
Who voted to close this as off-topic!? –  Johnsyweb Feb 25 '12 at 2:01
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7 Answers

max can be not initialized if no long line is found. Using it in if (max > 0) is then undefined behavior.

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That is certainly an error, but it can't explain the reported behaviour –  David Heffernan Feb 24 '12 at 21:22
1  
@Davidheffernan, yes it can see my answer –  user681007 Feb 24 '12 at 21:23
1  
@ricola86 Yes, you are right, I hadn't got beyond the fact that the if was indeterminate. –  David Heffernan Feb 24 '12 at 21:24
    
That's one of the errors, but len assignment is incorrect, too, see AusCBloke`s comment or my answer. –  schnaader Feb 24 '12 at 21:41
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This line:

  while (len = (getline(current)) > 0) {

assigns the value of (getline(current)) > 0) to len, which is not what you want (len will be 0 or 1 afterwards.

EDIT: Just saw AusCBloke's comment, you should also check for both len > max and len > MINLINE or you'll just get the latest line longer than 80 chars, not the longest overall line.

You should also initialize max to 0, so it should be

  max = 0;
  while ((len = getline(current)) > 0) {
    if ((len > MINLINE) && (len > max)) {

Other minor errors/tips:

  • The built in functions strcpy and strncpy do what your copy function does, there's no need to reinvent the wheel.
  • In your getline function, use MAXLINE to prevent buffer overflows.
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Thank you. This solved the problem. I can't believe i failed to realize something that simple. Thanks :D . –  geekkid Feb 24 '12 at 21:31
1  
I think the while condition wasn't "simple" to realize/spot. The possibility to combine assignments and conditions/booleans in C is mighty, but now you also know it's dark side :) –  schnaader Feb 24 '12 at 21:40
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Assuming that this is a homework, here's a hint: this piece of code looks very suspicious:

if (i == '\n') {
    current[i] = c;
    ++i;
}

Since i represents a position and is never assigned a character, you are effectively checking if the position is equal to the ASCII code of '\n'.

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Oh, :D . I meant to put "c" instead of "i". Thank you for your help. Btw, it's not homework, i'm just learning programming on my own and am currently working through K&R C programming book. –  geekkid Feb 24 '12 at 21:34
    
@geekkid Homework tag does not necessarily mean "homework assignment", it could be an assignment that you assign to yourself. The tag usually signals that you would prefer people to help you fix the problem on your own by pointing out errors, rather than re-writing parts of your code. –  dasblinkenlight Feb 24 '12 at 21:53
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Your copy method doesn't null terminate the string:

void copy(char from[], char to[]) {
    int i = 0;
    while ((to[i] = from[i]) != '\0') {
        ++i;
    }
    to[i] = '\0'
}

which probably explains the weird characters being printed.

You could use the builtin strcpy() to make life easier.

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I can't test your code right now, but it may be caused by character arrays not being cleaned. Try memset-ing the char arrays to 0.

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If you supply input data that has lines with more than 1000 characters you will overflow your fixed size buffers. By feeding in such input I was able to achieve the following output:

╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠ ╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠ ╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠

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Yes, I'm aware of that problem, but i'm on the 37th page in the k&R book and they say that as i'm just a beginner, for simplicity, i could temporary use a max line lenght of 1000 :d . But, could you explain maybe, how can i overcome this limitation in my code ? Thank you very much . –  geekkid Feb 24 '12 at 21:39
    
One way to get around it would be to stop reading into current when you are out of space. You have to keep reading characters until you came to EOF or \n, but just stop writing into current. Obviously the long line would be truncated when you output it. –  David Heffernan Feb 24 '12 at 21:43
    
@geekkid You can modify your while loop as follows: while (((c = getchar()) != EOF) && c != '\n' && i < MAXLINE-1). This will terminate the while loop at 999 characters which allows you 1 byte to '\0' terminate the string. –  Lou Feb 24 '12 at 21:47
    
@Lou That doesn't work at all. Then you are left in the middle of a line not having processed it all. You need to read all the way to the end of the line. Simple replace current[i] = c with if (i<MAXLINE-1) current[i] = c –  David Heffernan Feb 24 '12 at 21:48
    
@DavidHeffernan Agreed. Didn't think about the repercussion on the input. –  Lou Feb 24 '12 at 23:11
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There are a number of problems with your code. Mostly they are due to wheel-reinvention.

int getline(char current[]);

You don't need to define your own, getline(), there is already one in stdio.h.

void copy(char from[], char to[]);

There are also a number of functions for copying strings in string.h.

It's also a good idea to initialise all 0f your variables, like this:

    int len = 0; // current input line length

...this can prevent problems later, like comparisons to max when you haven't initialised it.

If you initialise max like this...

    int max = MINLINE; // the length of a longest line that's over 80 characters

...then it's easier to do the length comparison later on.

    char* current = NULL;
    size_t allocated = 0;

If current is NULL, then getline() will allocate a buffer for storing the line, which should be freed by the user program. getline() also takes a pointer to a size_t, which contains the amount of bytes needed to store the line.

    while (len = (getline(current)) > 0) {

Should be replaced by the following...

    while ((len = getline(&current, &allocated, stdin)) > 0) {

...which updates and compares len to 0.

Now, instead of...

        if (len > MINLINE) {

...you need to compare with the last longest line, which we initialised earlier...

        if (len > max) {

...and then you're good to update max as you were...

            max = len;

Where you called your copy() use strncpy(), which will prevent you writing over 1,000 characters into the allocated buffer:

            strncpy(over80, current, MAXLINE);

Because we initialised max, you'll need to change your check at the end from if (max > 0) to if (max > MINLINE).

One more tip, changing the following line...

        printf("No input line was over 80 characters long");

...to...

        printf("No input line was over %d characters long", MINLINE);

...will mean that you only have to change the #define at the top of the file to increase or decrease the minimum length.

Don't forget to...

    free(current);

...to prevent memory leaks!

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