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I use modules as namespaces and want to dynamically populate them with classes, like:

module Module1
  # ...
end

module Module2
  # ...
end

[Module1, Module2].each do |the_module|
  the_module.module_eval do
    class ApiTest < ActiveSupport::TestCase
      # ...
    end
  end
end

module_eval would work, except it does not change the nesting, preserving the outer one. As a result the contained constants are not nested in the modules.

The original motivation is to generate the same tests for different API implementations each contained in its own module.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's another option (note "self::")

module Module1
  # ...
end

module Module2
  # ...
end

[Module1, Module2].each do |the_module|
  the_module.module_eval do
    class self::ApiTest < ActiveSupport::TestCase
      # ...
    end
  end
end
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This is clearly the winner. –  qertoip Feb 25 '12 at 9:36

You need to use const_set:

module Bar; end
module Baz; end

[Bar, Baz].each do |mod|
  mod.const_set("Foo", Class.new do
    def hello
      "Hello world!"
    end
  end)
end

Bar::Foo.new.hello  # => "Hello world!"
Baz::Foo.new.hello  # => "Hello world!"

If the new class needs a superclass, you can pass it as the parameter to Class.new.

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I believe I have found a way to do this.

klass = Class.new(String)
klass.class_eval do
  def custom?; return true; end
end
Module1.module_exec do
 const_set :Custom, klass
end

Two::Custom.new.custom?
#=> true

The first argument for Class::new being the SuperClass (inheriting from)

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I haven't tested, but maybe something like this?

[Module1, Module2].each do |the_module|
  the_module.const_set("ApiTest", Class.new(ActiveSupport::TestCase) do
    # ...
  end)
end
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# Get ourselves a clean, top-level binding.
def main_binding
  binding
end

module ModuleUtils
  module ModuleMethods ; end
  self.extend ModuleMethods

  module ModuleMethods
    # Get a binding with a Module.nesting list that contains the
    # given module and all of its containing modules as described
    # by its fully qualified name in inner-to-outer order.
    def module_path_binding(mod)
      raise ArgumentError.raise(
        "Can't determine path nesting for a module with a blank name"
      ) if mod.name.to_s.empty?
      m, b = nil, main_binding
      mod.name.split('::').each do |part|
        m, b =
        eval(
          "[ #{part} , #{part}.module_eval('binding') ]",
          b
        )
      end
      raise "Module found at name path not same as specified module" unless m == mod
      b
    end
  end
end

You can then execute code in any nested module context you want by using ModuleUtils.module_path_binding(<some-module>) to get a binding that you can pass as the second argument to eval().

See more at https://gist.github.com/2051705.

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