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Some behavior that I can't really explain:
I'm following the djangobook.com tutorial and have connected a simple legacy mysql database.
I've defined the model like this:

class Sentences(models.Model):
    sentenceid = models.IntegerField(primary_key=True)
    sentence = models.TextField(blank=True)
    class Meta:
        db_table = u'sentences'

    def __unicode__(self):
        return unicode(self.sentence)

class Character(models.Model):
    charid = models.IntegerField(primary_key=True)
    symbol = models.TextField(blank=True)
    class Meta:
        db_table = u'characters'

    def __unicode__(self):
        return unicode(self.symbol)

Pretty standard stuff.

I'm testing out accessing it via the shell. The characters return beautifully but the sentences act strangely, despite being defined in (what I think is) exactly the same way.

>>> from myapp.models import Character
>>> c = Character.objects.filter(charid=70)
>>> c 
[<Character: β>]

This is perfect, but:

>>> from myapp.models import Sentences
>>> s = Sentences.objects.get(sentenceid=25)
>>> s
<Sentences: Sentences object>
>>> print s
Sentences object
>>> print s.sentence
The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. 

Why won't it return the sentence in the first case?Why do I have to use s.sentence instead?
Is it too long?
I only discovered s.sentence works by accident.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

UPDATE: You have another problem. Here, with your model code:

class Sentences(models.Model):
    sentenceid = models.IntegerField(primary_key=True)
    sentence = models.TextField(blank=True)
    class Meta:
        db_table = u'sentences'

    def __unicode__(self):
        return unicode(self.sentence)

__unicode__ works fine:

In [1]: from testapp.models import Sentences

In [2]: Sentences(sentence='foo').save()
DEBUG (0.000) INSERT INTO "sentences" ("sentenceid", "sentence") VALUES (None, foo); args=(None, 'foo')

In [3]: Sentences.objects.all()
DEBUG (0.000) SELECT "sentences"."sentenceid", "sentences"."sentence" FROM "sentences" LIMIT 21; args=()
Out[3]: [<Sentences: foo>]

Another try with a longer sentence:

In [1]: from testapp.models import Sentences

In [2]: Sentences(sentence='The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. ').save()
DEBUG (0.000) INSERT INTO "sentences" ("sentenceid", "sentence") VALUES (None, The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. ); args=(None, 'The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. ')

In [3]: Sentences.objects.all()
DEBUG (0.000) SELECT "sentences"."sentenceid", "sentences"."sentence" FROM "sentences" LIMIT 21; args=()
Out[3]: [<Sentences: foo>, <Sentences: The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. >]

So please check that:

  1. You have restarted the shell after having added the unicode definition

  2. Sentences.__module__ returns the right app.class (here: testapp.models)

  3. That Sentences.__unicode__ is defined

That works:

In [9]: Sentences.__unicode__
Out[9]: <unbound method Sentences.__unicode__>

That fails:

In [1]: from testapp.models import Sentences

In [2]: Sentences.__unicode__
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
AttributeError                            Traceback (most recent call last)
/home/jpic/testproject/<ipython-input-2-dcbda9dfb929> in <module>()
----> 1 Sentences.__unicode__

AttributeError: type object 'Sentences' has no attribute '__unicode__'

END UPDATE

filter() returns a QuerySet, which is a like a list of objects. Thus the brackets around the value [<Character: β>]:

>>> Character.objects.filter(charid=70)
[<Character: β>]

If you used get(), you would directly get the Character instance

>>> Character.objects.get(charid=70)
<Character: β>

The Character model has a 'symbol' TextField attribute, which you can access for example:

>>> Character.objects.get(charid=70).symbol
u'β'

You understand that it's perfectly normal that Sentences.objects.get() returns a single Sentences object:

>>> Sentences.objects.get(sentenceid=25)
<Sentences: Sentences object>

Now, your Sentences model has a "sentence" TextField attribute, which you can access as such:

>>> Sentences.objects.get(sentenceid=25).sentence
The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. 

Everything is working and the behaviors are consistent.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your reply, but it doesn't quite answer my question. I asked really why the "getter" for Character returns <Character: β> and the sentences one returns <Sentences: Sentences object> rather than with the sentence shown. Perhaps this is because it is too long. They are defined in exactly the same way, so should return similarly. I'm not sure! –  LittleBobbyTables Feb 27 '12 at 16:56
    
I see, that's strange. I updated my answer maybe something can help you in it. –  jpic Feb 27 '12 at 17:16

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