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Suppose I have something like this:

public abstract class AbstractDataObject
{
   public abstract void gettableName();

   public void delete()
   {
      SQLQuery("..." + getTableName()+ "..." );
   }
}

public class DataObject extends AbstractDataObject
{
   final static String tableName;

   public String getTableName()
   {
      return tableName;
   }
}

I want method delete() to query a different table for each subclass of AbstractDataObject. So I override getTableName() just to pass a static constant that's specific to each subclass. Would this be acceptable or bad practice?

share|improve this question
1  
Looks like a good enough solution to me (although creating your own data access layer sounds like trouble). – alex Feb 24 '12 at 22:07
    
You want to make a factory. and get your data objects through a DI framework. – DarthVader Feb 24 '12 at 22:07
    
IMO it make sense, although is some other language gettableName() would have been a implementable method in the abstract class. Think of somethings like getTableName() {return this.class.getTableName();} and that would avoid the need of the static string in subclass only a static method getTableName would have been necessary. – mathk Feb 24 '12 at 22:38
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I have done this a lot. Many a times writing a framework, the base class has a getType() or getName() or some such abstract method. The derived classes typically override this to return a static member's value`

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In this particular example it seems like overkill to have a subclass just to return a different constant. I would make the AbstractDataClass object non-abstract and pass the table name in as a constructor parameter.

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1  
Dependency injection is new new(); – DarthVader Feb 24 '12 at 22:06
1  
The actual classes would have other methods as well. DataObject would have some other methods of its own and AbstractDataObject would have maybe three non-overridden methods that would use getTableName(). – ikz Feb 24 '12 at 22:10
    
+1 Just pass the table name in the constructor or have a setter method. – dbyrne Feb 24 '12 at 22:10
    
But all objects of the subclass would have the same tableName, and each subclass will have some specific methods. i.e., I will have something like CustomerDataObject, SellerDataObject. tableName will not change for the subclass. So it seems tedious to have to pass in a name each. Sorry, I thought it would be more convenient if I just posted a highly simplified version. – ikz Feb 24 '12 at 22:22

Yes, it is an acceptable practice. static final variable may be perceived as a kind of constant in Java and I guess this is one of the possible approaches to have a constant in Java code.

However, your code is incorrect. Here is corrected one:

public abstract class AbstractDataObject
{
   public abstract String getTableName();

   public void delete()
   {
      SQLQuery("..." + getTableName()+ "..." );
   }
}

public class DataObject extends AbstractDataObject
{
   final static String tableName = "some_table";

   public String getTableName()
   {
      return tableName;
   }
}
share|improve this answer

If that is the only Functionality of the DataObject, it really seems excessive, given that you can just put all your table names in a list and loop over it:

List<String> tables = new List<String>{ "TabA","TabB","TabC"};
foreach( var tname in tables )
{
   deleteTable(tname); 
}

I know tho, by looking at your code, that there is also SQLQuery, which you need access to, but I would move that out of AbstractDataObject as well.

after comments: ok, fine, then here is my suggestion:

public abstract class AbstractDataObject
{
   private String tableName;
   public AbstractDataObject(String tableName)
   {
      this.tableName = tableName;
   }

   public void delete()
   {
      SQLQuery("..." + tableName + "..." );
   }
}

public class SellerDataObject extends AbstractDataObject
{
   public DataObject(): super("Seller")
   {
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
You did not understand the idea behind the AbstractDataObject. A loop is absolutely not what you want to do. – mathk Feb 24 '12 at 22:10
    
I certainly understood what he was trying to do, but I wanted to prevent him from writing class hierarchies, when he could accomplish the same with a single loop (therefore the initial remark). but hey, this is how SOF works. – ämbi Feb 24 '12 at 22:14
    
Again a loop and a class hierarchies are totally unrelated things. – mathk Feb 24 '12 at 22:24

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