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Does anyone knows why after I apply this algorithm in c++ to reduce the volume of a pcm apears a white noise in the background?

for(int i = 0; i<pcm.length(); i+=2) {
   quint16 byte0 = pcm[i];
   quint16 byte1 = pcm[i+1];

   //merge byte0 and byte1
   qint16 n = (byte1 << 8) + byte0;

   n *= volume; // multiplier;

   //split n into byte0 and byte1
   byte1   = (n >> 8) & 255;
   byte0    = n & 255;

   //save the new values
   pcm[i] = byte0;
   pcm[i+1] = byte1;
}
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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

After a long time, I come with the solution. The problem was the mode that I was merging the two bites.

 for(int i = 0; i<pcm.length(); i+=2) {
   quint16 byte0 = pcm[i];
   quint16 byte1 = pcm[i+1];

   //merge byte0 and byte1
   qint16 n = 0;
   n |= speakersRaw[j][i+1] & 0xFF;
   n <<= 8;
   n |= speakersRaw[j][i] & 0xFF;

   n *= volume; // multiplier;

   //split n into byte0 and byte1
   byte1   = (n >> 8) & 255;
   byte0    = n & 255;

   //save the new values
   pcm[i] = byte0;
   pcm[i+1] = byte1;
}
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Your n *= 0.5 is effectively doing the same as n >>= 1. You're shifting the least-significant bit from byte1 into the most significant bit of byte0, which is likely the source of your noise.

Why are you combining the two values into one integer rather than doing each one separately?

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I expect they are 16 bit samples represented in bytes. Shifting the LSB from the high byte into the MSB of low byte is normal. –  janm Feb 24 '12 at 22:33
    
Ah, yes that would make sense. Need to see what type pcm is really. –  spencercw Feb 24 '12 at 22:38
    
the 0.5 it's just a random value. I changed that with a variable. pcm is a QByteArray from qt, and i am using QAudioOutput for audio playback. The only problem that i can think of is that the i am losing somedata here n *= volume because of precision or something... –  Szabo Bogdan Feb 25 '12 at 0:32
    
What's the sample format? I'm guessing signed or unsigned 16-bit int? –  spencercw Feb 25 '12 at 0:35
    
this is the format:format.setSampleSize(16); format.setByteOrder(QAudioFormat::LittleEndian); format.setSampleType(QAudioFormat::SignedInt); –  Szabo Bogdan Feb 25 '12 at 0:40

Perhaps you're packing and unpacking your bytes in the wrong order?

qint16 n = (byte0 << 8) + byte1;

byte0   = (n >> 8) & 255;
byte1   = n & 255;  
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The byte order mentioned by Mark Ransom is an obvious possible problem. You should check that.

The other possible problem is sign extension.

If you have signed samples and you are manipulating them in an unsigned type, you will lose the sign bit on all the negative samples.

If your byte type is signed then you will get sign extension into the high byte when you load byte0 and byte1, again not what you want.

Does the quint16 type match the actual type of the samples? If not, you should use the same type. You should make user you use unsigned char as your byte type.

Update from info in comments:

To test the sign extension theory, change the:

n *= 0.5;

line to:

n = ((short) n) * 0.5;
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I assumed the quint16 type was unsigned 16 bit and the pcm array was an unsigned 8 bit, while the full 16-bit sample should be interpreted as signed. –  Mark Ransom Feb 24 '12 at 22:35
    
I don't think it's about the byte order. If was that i should get some strange and annoying noise. If i omit this line n *= volume i have the nice original track. Maybe i am loosing some precision, but i can't figure how and why... –  Szabo Bogdan Feb 25 '12 at 0:39
    
@Szabo Bogdan: If you omit the "n *= 0.5" line and the problem goes away, that is consistent with quint16 being unsigned when it should be signed. –  janm Feb 25 '12 at 2:11
    
@MarkRansom: With those assumptions, the "n *= 0.5" line is obviously wrong and all negative samples will be damaged. –  janm Feb 25 '12 at 2:13
    
@SzaboBogdan: Have a look at the updated answer. I think you are destroying all the negative samples. –  janm Feb 25 '12 at 2:14

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