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I need to split space-delimited TCL lists on double braces... for instance...

OUTPUT = """{{172.25.50.10:01:01-Ethernet 172.25.50.10:01:02-Ethernet {Traffic Item 1}}} {{172.25.50.10:01:02-Ethernet 172.25.50.10:01:01-Ethernet {Traffic Item 1}}}"""

This should parse into...

OUTPUT = ["""{{172.25.50.10:01:01-Ethernet 172.25.50.10:01:02-Ethernet {Traffic Item 1}}}""", 
    """{{172.25.50.10:01:02-Ethernet 172.25.50.10:01:01-Ethernet {Traffic Item 1}}}"""]

I have tried...

import re
splitter = re.compile('}}\s+{{')
splitter.split(OUTPUT)

However, that trims the braces in the center...

['{{172.25.50.10:01:01-Ethernet 172.25.50.10:01:02-Ethernet {Traffic Item 1}',
'172.25.50.10:01:02-Ethernet 172.25.50.10:01:01-Ethernet {Traffic Item 1}}}']

I can't figure out how to only split on the spaces between }} {{. I know I can cheat and insert missing braces manually, but I would rather find a simple way to parse this out efficiently.

Is there a way to parse OUTPUT with re.split (or some other python parsing framework) for an arbitrary number of space-delimited rows containing {{content here}}?

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could modify your regex to use positive lookahead/behind assertions, which don't consume any of the string:

re.compile('(?<=}})\s+(?={{)')
share|improve this answer
    
Brilliant, I had not thought of a lookahead – Mike Pennington Feb 24 '12 at 23:17

Pyparsing has improved since that comp.lang.python discussion, and I think even Cameron Laird would not complain about a solution using pyparsing's nestedExpr method:

OUTPUT = """{{172.25.50.10:01:01-Ethernet 172.25.50.10:01:02-Ethernet {Traffic Item 1}}} {{172.25.50.10:01:02-Ethernet 172.25.50.10:01:01-Ethernet {Traffic "Item 1"}}}"""

from pyparsing import nestedExpr, originalTextFor

nestedBraces1 = nestedExpr('{', '}')
for nb in nestedBraces1.searchString(OUTPUT):
    print nb

nestedBraces2 = originalTextFor(nestedExpr('{', '}'))
for nb in nestedBraces2.searchString(OUTPUT):
    print nb

Prints:

[[['172.25.50.10:01:01-Ethernet', '172.25.50.10:01:02-Ethernet', ['Traffic', 'Item', '1']]]]
[[['172.25.50.10:01:02-Ethernet', '172.25.50.10:01:01-Ethernet', ['Traffic', '"Item 1"']]]]
['{{172.25.50.10:01:01-Ethernet 172.25.50.10:01:02-Ethernet {Traffic Item 1}}}']
['{{172.25.50.10:01:02-Ethernet 172.25.50.10:01:01-Ethernet {Traffic "Item 1"}}}']

If you are going to have to resplit the data to get the individual items from the nested braces, then the original nested list output from nestedExpr might be of better help (note that even if a quoted string is in the list, the quoted item is kept as its own item). But if you really, really want that string containing the nested braces, then use the form with originalTextFor shown in nestedBraces2.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice, that second example is right on target... – Mike Pennington Feb 24 '12 at 23:17

You can use a regular expression to extract, instead of split off, the list item values…

re.findall(r'({{.*?}})(?:\Z|\s+)', OUTPUT)

For example:

In [30]: regex = re.compile(r'({{.*?}})(?:\Z|\s+)')

In [31]: regex.findall(OUTPUT)
Out[31]: 
['{{172.25.50.10:01:01-Ethernet 172.25.50.10:01:02-Ethernet {Traffic Item 1}}}',
 '{{172.25.50.10:01:02-Ethernet 172.25.50.10:01:01-Ethernet {Traffic Item 1}}}']
share|improve this answer
1  
I didn't downvote, but the solution as-posted is trimming off the double braces on both sides – Mike Pennington Feb 24 '12 at 23:11
    
I thought you wanted the content... – Gandaro Feb 24 '12 at 23:13
    
Please look closely at the example shown after "This should parse into..." – Mike Pennington Feb 24 '12 at 23:16
    
Fixed. It was just moving two parentheses... – Gandaro Feb 24 '12 at 23:18
2  
@MikePennington: use re.findall() with his regex not re.split(). – RanRag Feb 24 '12 at 23:22

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