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I have the following powershell script that will parse some very large file for ETL purposes. For starters my test file is ~ 30MB. Larger files around 200MB are expected. So I have a few questions. The script below works, but it takes a very long time to process even a 30MB file. I'm new to powershell, so any pointers in tuning this up would be much appreciated. -- Thanks.

Powershell Script:

            $path = "E:\Documents\Projects\ESPS\Dev\DataFiles\DimProductionOrderOperation"
            $infile = "14SEP11_ProdOrderOperations.txt"
            $outfile = "PROCESSED_14SEP11_ProdOrderOperations.txt"
            $array = @()

            $content = gc $path\$infile | 
                select -skip 4 |
                where {$_ -match "[|].*[|].*"} | 
                foreach {$_ -replace "^[|]","" -replace "[|]$",""} 

            $header = $content[0]

            $array = $content[0]
            for ($i = 1; $i -le $content.length; $i+=1) {
                if ($array[$i] -ne $content[0]) {$array += $content[$i]}
            }

            $array | out-file $path\$outfile -encoding ASCII

DataFile Excerpt:

            ---------------------------
        |Data statistics|Number of|
        |-------------------------|
        |Records passed |   93,118|
        ---------------------------



        02/14/2012                                                                                                                                                           Production Operations and Confirmations                                                                                                                                                              2
        -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Production Operations and Confirmations
        -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        |ProductionOrderNumber|MaterialNumber                       |ModifiedDate|Plant|OperationRoutingNumber|WorkCenter|OperationStatus|IsActive|     WbsElement|SequenceNumber|OperationNumber|OperationDescription                    |OperationQty|ConfirmedYieldQty|StandardValueLabor|ActualDirectLaborHrs|ActualContractorLaborHrs|ActualOvertimeLaborHrs|ConfirmationNumber|
        |---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------|
        |180849518            |011255486L1                          |02/08/2012  |2101 |            9901123118|56B30     |I9902          |        |SOC10MA2302SOCJ31|              |0140           |Operation 1                             |          1 |               0 |              0.0 |                    |                499.990 |                      |        9908651250|
        |180849518            |011255486L1                          |02/08/2012  |2101 |            9901123118|56B30     |I9902          |        |SOC10MA2302SOCJ31|14            |9916           |Operation 2                             |          1 |               0 |            499.0 |                    |                        |                      |        9908532289|
        |181993564            |011255486L1                          |02/09/2012  |2101 |            9901288820|56B30     |I9902          |        |SOC10MD2302SOCJ31|14            |9916           |Operation 1                             |          1 |               0 |            499.0 |                    |                399.599 |                      |        9908498544|
        |180885825            |011255486L1                          |02/08/2012  |2101 |            9901162239|56B30     |I9902          |        |SOC10MG2302SOCJ31|              |0150           |Operation 3                             |          1 |               0 |              0.0 |                    |                882.499 |                      |        9908099659|
        |180885825            |011255486L1                          |02/08/2012  |2101 |            9901162239|56B30     |I9902          |        |SOC10MG2302SOCJ31|14            |9916           |Operation 4                             |          1 |               0 |            544.0 |                    |                        |                      |        9908858514|
        |181638583            |990104460I0                          |02/10/2012  |2101 |            9902123289|56G99     |I9902          |        |SOC11MAR105SOCJ31|              |0160           |Operation 5                             |          1 |               0 |          1,160.0 |                    |                        |                      |        9914295010|
        |181681218            |990104460B0                          |02/08/2012  |2101 |            9902180981|56G99     |I9902          |        |SOC11MAR328SOCJ31|0             |9910           |Operation 6                             |          1 |               0 |            916.0 |                    |                        |                      |        9914621885|
        |181681036            |990104460I0                          |02/09/2012  |2101 |            9902180289|56G99     |I9902          |        |SOC11MAR108SOCJ31|              |0180           |Operation 8                             |          1 |               0 |              1.0 |                    |                        |                      |        9914619196|
        |189938054            |011255486A2                          |02/10/2012  |2101 |            9999206805|5AD99     |I9902          |        |RS08MJ2305SOCJ31 |              |0599           |Operation 8                             |          1 |               0 |              0.0 |                    |                        |                      |        9901316289|
        |181919894            |012984532A3                          |02/10/2012  |2101 |            9902511433|A199399Z  |I9902          |        |SOC12MCB101SOCJ31|0             |9935           |Operation 9                             |          1 |               0 |              0.5 |                    |                        |                      |        9916914233|
        |181919894            |012984532A3                          |02/10/2012  |2101 |            9902511433|A199399Z  |I9902          |        |SOC12MCB101SOCJ31|22            |9951           |Operation 10                            |          1 |               0 |           68.080 |                    |                        |                      |        9916914224|
share|improve this question
    
A search for "Get-Content large files" was very helpful. See rkeithhill.wordpress.com/2007/06/17/…. –  Jay Bazuzi Feb 25 '12 at 0:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Your script reads one line at a time (slow!) and stores almost the entire file in memory (big!).

Try this: (Not tested extensively)

     $path = "E:\Documents\Projects\ESPS\Dev\DataFiles\DimProductionOrderOperation"
     $infile = "14SEP11_ProdOrderOperations.txt"
     $outfile = "PROCESSED_14SEP11_ProdOrderOperations.txt"

     $batch = 1000

         [regex]$match_regex = '^\|.+\|.+\|.+'
         [regex]$replace_regex = '^\|(.+)\|$'

     $header_line = (select-string -path $path\$infile -pattern $match_regex -list).line

         [regex]$header_regex = [regex]::escape($header_line)

    $header_line.trim('|') | set-content $path\$outfile

     Get-Content $path\$infile -ReadCount $batch |
         foreach {
                  $_ -match $match_regex -notmatch $header_regex -Replace $replace_regex ,'$1' | Out-File $path\$outfile -Append
         }

That's a compromise between memory usage and speed. The -match and -replace operators will work on an array, so you can filter and replace an entire array at once without having to foreach through every record. The -readcount will cause the file to be read in chunks of $batch records, so you're basically reading in 1000 records at a time, doing the match and replace on that batch then appending the result to your output file. Then it goes back for the next 1000 records. Increasing the size of $batch should speed it up, but will make it use more memory. Adjust that to suit your resources.

share|improve this answer
    
This is the right approach. –  Jay Bazuzi Feb 25 '12 at 0:13
    
Thanks. I looked at it again, and did a little tuning. Not sure how much that will help the performance, but if I'm reading the docs right, compiled regexes are faster, and casting the variable as [regex] causes them to be compiled. –  mjolinor Feb 25 '12 at 3:25
    
This is good, but I also need to compare every element of the array with the first element (header) and remove it if there is a match - because it is repeated throughout the file. This seems to be where things really bog down in the script. With your approach how do I do this without assigning gC to a variable? –  shawno Feb 25 '12 at 14:30
    
Do you need to include one copy of the header at the beginning of the output file? –  mjolinor Feb 25 '12 at 14:35
    
I updated the script. It should grab the header line from the file, trim off the leading and trailing |, and start a new $outfile using that for the header before the loop starts. Using [regex]::escape, it creates a new regex that does a literal match to the header line, and then a -notmatch on that added to the -match -replace chain should drop those out inside the loop. –  mjolinor Feb 25 '12 at 15:06

The Get-Content cmdlet does not perform as well as a StreamReader when dealing with very large files. You can read a file line by line using a StreamReader like this:

$path = 'C:\A-Very-Large-File.txt'
$r = [IO.File]::OpenText($path)
while ($r.Peek() -ge 0) {
    $line = $r.ReadLine()
    # Process $line here...
}
$r.Dispose()

Some performance comparisons:

Measure-Command {Get-Content .\512MB.txt > $null}

Total Seconds: 49.4742533

Measure-Command {
    $r = [IO.File]::OpenText('512MB.txt')
    while ($r.Peek() -ge 0) {
        $r.ReadLine() > $null
    }
    $r.Dispose()
}

Total Seconds: 27.666803

share|improve this answer
    
That is a great suggestion. I should also point out that the get-content part of the script works pretty quickly; its that part where I loop through everything in the array comparing every element to the first element in the array that seems to make it run extremeley slow. –  shawno Feb 24 '12 at 23:45
1  
Get-Content does not load the whole file in to memory, but assigning the result to a variable does. This is an important design principle in PowerShell - streaming through a pipeline can be memory efficient even for very large data sets. –  Jay Bazuzi Feb 25 '12 at 0:07
1  
If the comparison is choking, I wonder if the PC is having to page in/out data as it checks the element x against element 0 because it can't fit the whole array of string in memory -- if so, $content[0] may not be a constant-time operation even though on a small dataset it could be assumed to be. Maybe try copying the contents of $content[0] into a new variable and compare against that instead of the array element. –  Daniel Richnak Feb 25 '12 at 0:09
    
@JayBazuzi Fair point. Typically a variable is assigned to the output of Get-Content. I updated my answer based on your input. Thanks. –  Andy Arismendi Feb 25 '12 at 0:59
    
@daniel richnak, thanks for that comment - I hadn't considered that regarding the element 0. –  shawno Feb 25 '12 at 14:35

This is almost a non-answer...I love PowerShell...but I will not use it to parse log files, especially large log files. Use Microsoft's Log Parser.

C:\>type input.txt | logparser "select substr(field1,1) from STDIN" -i:TSV -nskiplines:14 -headerrow:off -iseparator:spaces -o:tsv -headers:off -stats:off
share|improve this answer
    
This is a good non-answer. Powershell can be painfully slow with huge files. Coming from a linux background you expect to pipe stuff through grep fairly efficiently, but Get-Content and Select-String just don't compete. I love PowerShell too, but not when parsing and filtering massive log files. –  ben Jan 31 at 11:54

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