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Why does it crash when I get to the copy constructor function?

In the copy procedure that you will find in my class definitions, I'm making sure that the Queue that will be created as a copy of some other original Queue is empty before copying begins: let's say Queue q1 is not empty and I want to turn q1 into q2. I want to empty the contents of q1 before copying the contents of q2 to q1..

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <cassert>

using namespace std;

class Dnode
{
    public:
       Dnode(int);
       int  n;
       Dnode*   l, *r;
};

Dnode::Dnode(int tx)
{
    n = tx;
    l = r = NULL;
}

class Queue // reminder: insertions at the rear, deletions at the front
{
    public:
       Queue();
       void enqueue(int x);
       int dequeue(void);
       bool empty(void) const;
       void display(void) const;
       Queue(const Queue&); //copy constructor

    private:
       Dnode*   front, *back;
       void copy(Dnode*);
       void free();

};

Queue::Queue()
{
    front = back = NULL;
}


void Queue::enqueue(int x)
{
    Dnode*  d = new Dnode(x);
    if (empty())
        front = back = d;
    else
    {
        back->r = d;
        d->l = back;
        back = d;
    }
}

int Queue::dequeue(void)
{
    assert(! empty());
    Dnode*  temp = front;
    front = front->r;
    if (front == NULL)
        back = NULL;
    else    front->l = NULL;
    int x = temp->n;
    delete temp;
    return x;
}


bool Queue::empty(void) const
{
    return front == NULL;
}

void Queue::display(void) const
{
    for (Dnode* d = front; d != NULL; d = d->r)
        cout << d->n << " ";
    cout << endl;
}

void Queue::copy(Dnode* dn) // "dn" will be "Front" of Queue being copied
{                           // this procedure will be called in Copy Constructor  
    Dnode* temp=front;      // found underneath this procedure
    while(front!=back)      
    {                       
        front=front->r;
        delete temp;
        temp=front;
    }

    delete temp;

    front=back=temp=NULL;

    if(dn!=NULL)
    {
        while(dn->r!=NULL)
        {
            enqueue(dn->n);
            dn=dn->r;
        }
        enqueue(dn->n);
    }
}

Queue::Queue(const Queue& x)
{
    copy(x.front);
}

int main()
{
    Queue   q;
    if (q.empty()) cout << "q empty" << endl;

    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) q.enqueue(i);

    q.display();

    int x = q.dequeue();

    cout << "x is " << x << endl;

    q.display();

    Queue q1(q); //<----program crashes when we get here

    q1.display();
}
share|improve this question
1  
Why are you deleting if you are copying? There is no need to free memory during your copy. In fact you should be allocating memory in the new instance of Queue to hold the copy. –  linuxuser27 Feb 24 '12 at 23:11
    
You're using and deleting uninitialized pointers all over the place... –  jrok Feb 24 '12 at 23:15
    
Emptying the Queue that will become a copy f some other Queue may be unnecessary as you say, but that shouldn't be the reason the program crashes right? What am I doing wrong? –  user1073400 Feb 24 '12 at 23:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You're confusing a copy constructor with an assignment operator. In an assignment operator, you have to delete the current queue and replace it with a copy of the second parameter. But this is a copy constructor. There is no current queue. Your members are uninitialized. So when you begin by trying to delete the existing queue, you're messing with uninitialized pointers.

share|improve this answer
    
You were right the whole time :) –  user1073400 Feb 24 '12 at 23:48

You forgot to initialize back and front in your copy constructor.

void Queue::copy(Dnode* dn) // "dn" will be "Front" of Queue being copied
{   
  Dnode* temp=front;      // found underneath this procedure
  while(front!=back)      
  {                       
      front=front->r;
      delete temp;
      temp=front;
  }

The while loop is then acting randomly, as front is unitialized, and causes the crash.

share|improve this answer
    
I am assuming that front and back have values when calling the copy procedure but I cannot possibly know what these are. By the way, I'm sure you are all right about the uninitialised pointers, it's just that I somehow get confused when it comes to the copy constructor... –  user1073400 Feb 24 '12 at 23:22
    
@user1073400 You can't delete something that wasn't newd, it's undefined behaviour. But that's what you're doing in your copy constructor. –  jrok Feb 24 '12 at 23:25
    
@user1073400: your copy member function is fine. The thing is, when you are calling Queue q1(q);, the object q1 you create has random values as for front and back since the constructor it was created with did not initialize them. In turn, front is (probably) not null and different from back. –  qdii Feb 24 '12 at 23:26
    
@jrok: the crash may even occur on the line right before the delete: front=front->r; calling r and passing it an invalid pointer as this. –  qdii Feb 24 '12 at 23:29
    
hmm... if in main() I type smth like " Queue q1; " won't that initialise its pointers to NULL according to the default constructor? And what if I then use the "q1(q);" ?? –  user1073400 Feb 24 '12 at 23:29

You need to initialize your front and back pointers to null, then loop through the source Queue x grab each Dnode and enqueue it to the new Queue.

share|improve this answer
    
what if my "new" Queue is not empty afterall and I want to turn it into a copy of Queue x? –  user1073400 Feb 24 '12 at 23:24
    
The you wouldn't be using your copy constructor. To accomplish what you ask, you'd need to drain the Queue first, then invoke a corrected flavor of copy(). –  Lou Feb 24 '12 at 23:26
1  
@user1073400 How could your "new" queue possibly contain anything? While your copy constructor is running, the object is not even fully constructed yet, it's being built anew, from scratch. Perhaps you're confusing copy constructor with assignment operator? –  jrok Feb 24 '12 at 23:31
    
@jrok Bingo! :) I believe that's what I've been confusing the whole time. I thought that a copy constructor constructs a copy of some Queue Qx and that it was possible to use an already existing Queue Qy to turn that into a copy of Qx.. Wow.. Good one right? :) –  user1073400 Feb 24 '12 at 23:38

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