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I'm wondering if there's any difference between the code fragment

from urllib import request

and the fragment

import urllib.request

or if they are interchangeable. If they are interchangeable, which is the "standard"/"preferred" syntax (if there is one)?

Thanks!

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I'm not an expert on import so I wont leave an answer, but there is a difference about how things are going into sys.modules: take a look at this answer (at the end). (Maybe there's someone who can explain it better than me) –  Rik Poggi Feb 25 '12 at 0:25

7 Answers 7

up vote 32 down vote accepted

It depends on how you want to access the import when you refer to it.

from urllib import request
# access request directly.
mine = request()

import urllib.request
# used as urllib.request
mine = urllib.request()

You can also alias things yourself when you import for simplicity or to avoid masking built ins:

from os import open as open_
# lets you use os.open without destroying the 
# built in open() which returns file handles.
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I just tried import urllib.request and it doesn't work at all (python 2.6.5 Ubuntu). –  tkone Feb 24 '12 at 23:33
2  
You should use a trailing underscore (rather than leading) to prevent clashing with built-ins. –  deadly Aug 28 '12 at 10:36
    
@deadly - bad habit - it prevents an IDE warning in Eclipse to use a leading underscore at times. Thanks. –  g.d.d.c Jan 29 at 6:40

There's very little difference in functionality, but the first form is preferential, as you can do

from urllib import request, parse, error

where in the second form that would have to be

import urllib.request, urllib.parse, urllib.error

and you'd have to reference using the fully qualified name, which is way less elegant.

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17  
I disagree. It's purely a matter of pragmatism and context. Remember the zen of python: "Namespaces are one honking great idea -- let's do more of those!" The former is disadvantageous in that it flattens this namespace hierarchy and might overwrite/mask other variables in the scope. –  mvanveen Feb 24 '12 at 23:31
    
Seriously when I try to import urllib.request my interpreter says it doesn't work –  tkone Feb 24 '12 at 23:34
1  
I agree it's down to context, and the latter is advantageous to partition the namespace, but in general I prefer the first form. –  Karl Barker Feb 24 '12 at 23:35
    
>>> import urllib.request, urllib.parse, urllib.error Traceback (most recent call last): File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module> ImportError: No module named request >>> –  tkone Feb 24 '12 at 23:36
2  
@tkone urllib was split in Python3.0 - if you're using an older version it'll just be import urllib :) –  Karl Barker Feb 24 '12 at 23:36

Already many people explain about import vs from, even i wanna try to explain bit more under the hood, where are all the places it got changes:

First of all let me explain:

import X :

imports the module X, and creates a reference to that module in the current 
namespace. Then you need to define completed module path to access a 
particular attribute or method from inside the module.

eg: X.name or X.attribute

from X import * :

*imports the module X, and creates references to all public objects 
   defined by that module in the current namespace (that is, everything 
   that doesn’t have a name starting with “_”) or what ever the name 
   you mentioned. 
   Or in other words, after you’ve run this statement, you can simply 
   use a plain name to refer to things defined in module X. But X itself 
   is not defined, so X.name doesn’t work. And if name was already 
   defined, it is replaced by the new version. And if name in X is
   changed to point to some other object, your module won’t notice.

* This makes all names from the module available in the local namespace.

Now lets see when we do import X.Y:

>>> import sys
>>> import os.path

Check sys.modules with name os and os.path:

>>> sys.modules['os']
<module 'os' from '/System/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/os.pyc'>
>>> sys.modules['os.path']
<module 'posixpath' from '/System/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/posixpath.pyc'>

Check globals() and locals() namespace dict with name os and os.path:

 >>> globals()['os']
<module 'os' from '/System/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/os.pyc'>
>>> locals()['os']
<module 'os' from '/System/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/os.pyc'>
>>> globals()['os.path']
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
KeyError: 'os.path'
>>>    

From above example we found that only os is inserted in local and global namespace. So, we should be able to use:

 >>> os
 <module 'os' from     
  '/System/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/os.pyc'>
 >>> os.path
 <module 'posixpath' from      
 '/System/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/posixpath.pyc'>
 >>>

But not path

>>> path
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
NameError: name 'path' is not defined 
>>>

Once you delete the os from locals() namespace, you won't be able to access os as well as os.path even though they are exists in sys.modules:

>>> del locals()['os']
>>> os
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
NameError: name 'os' is not defined
>>> os.path
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
NameError: name 'os' is not defined
>>>

Now lets come to from :

** from :**

>>> import sys
>>> from os import path

Check sys.modules with name os and os.path:

>>> sys.modules['os']
<module 'os' from '/System/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/os.pyc'>
>>> sys.modules['os.path']
<module 'posixpath' from '/System/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/posixpath.pyc'>

Oh, we found that in sys.modules we found as same as we did before by using import name

Ok, lets check how it looks like in locals() and globals() namespace dict:

>>> globals()['path']
<module 'posixpath' from '/System/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/posixpath.pyc'>
>>> locals()['path']
<module 'posixpath' from '/System/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/posixpath.pyc'>
>>> globals()['os']
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
KeyError: 'os'
>>>

You can access by using name path not by os.path:

>>> path
<module 'posixpath' from '/System/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/posixpath.pyc'>
>>> os.path
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
NameError: name 'os' is not defined
>>>

Lets delete 'path' from locals():

>>> del locals()['path']
>>> path
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
NameError: name 'path' is not defined
>>>

One final example using alias :

>>> from os import path as HELL_BOY
>>> locals()['HELL_BOY']
<module 'posixpath' from '/System/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/posixpath.pyc'>
>>> globals()['HELL_BOY']
<module 'posixpath' from /System/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/posixpath.pyc'>
>>>

And no path defined:

>>> globals()['path']
Traceback (most recent call last):
 File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
KeyError: 'path'
>>>

One pitfall about using from:

When you are import same name from two different module:

>>> import sys
>>> from os import stat
>>> locals()['stat']
<built-in function stat>
>>>
>>> stat
<built-in function stat>

Import stat from shutil again:

>>>
>>> from shutil import stat
>>> locals()['stat']
<module 'stat' from 
'/System/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/stat.pyc'>
>>> stat
<module 'stat' from 
'/System/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/stat.pyc'>
>>>

THE LAST IMPORT WILL WIN

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There is a difference. In some cases, one of those will work and the other won't. Here is an example: say we have the following structure:

foo.py
mylib\
    a.py
    b.py

Now, I want to import b.py to a.py. And I want to import a.py to foo. How do I do this? Two statements: In a I write:

import b

in foo.py I write:

import mylib.a

Well, this will generate an ImportError when trying to run foo.py. The interpreter will complain about the import statement in a.py (import b) saying there is no module b. So how can one fix this? In such a situation, changing the import statement in a to import mylib.b will not work since a and b are both in lib. The solution here (or at least one solution) is to use absolute import:

from lib import b

Source: Python: importing a module that imports a module

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You are using Python3 were urllib in the package. Both forms are acceptable and no one form of import is preferred over the other. Sometimes when there are multiple package directories involved you may to use the former from x.y.z.a import s

In this particular case with urllib package, the second way import urllib.request and use of urllib.request is how standard library uniformly uses it.

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In python 2.x at least you cannot do import urllib2.urlopen

You have to do from urllib2 import urlopen

Python 2.6.5 (r265:79063, Apr 16 2010, 13:09:56)
[GCC 4.4.3] on linux2
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> import urllib2.urlopen
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
ImportError: No module named urlopen
>>> import urllib.request
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
ImportError: No module named request
>>>
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My main complaint with import urllib.request is that you can still reference urllib.parse even though it isn't imported.

>>> import urllib3.request
>>> urllib3.logging
<module 'logging' from '/usr/lib/python2.7/logging/__init__.pyc'>

Also request for me is under urllib3. Python 2.7.4 ubuntu

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