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I have been reading on the advantages and disadvantages of using a UUID as a primar key in a database.

The main argument I have been hearing against such a practice is that if they aren't generated sequentially they can fragment your indexes and create problems with paging (I have also heard that is blows out the size of your databases but lets leave that aside for now).

MSSQL Server allows you to create sequential UUIDs within the database using a custom method (e.g. CREATE TABLE MyUniqueTable(UniqueColumn UNIQUEIDENTIFIER DEFAULT NEWSEQUENTIALID()).

The problem with it though is that it creates a non standards compliant UUID that isnt obviously sequential. I have backward engineered the format and encapsulated it in a builder class for use or study:

/**
 * <p>
 * Reverse engineering effort to replicate how SQL Server creates ordered 
 * UUIDs so that we may construct them within the application. The builder will 
 * only accept version 1 and version 14 (Microsoft specific) uuid objects as a 
 * seed.
 * </p>
 * <p>
 * The algorithm is reversible so that a version 1 uuid may be created from a version
 * 14 uuid and vice versa.
 * </p>
 * @author Michael Lambert
 *
 */
public static class MsSqlOrderedUuidBuilder {

    private static final TimeBasedGenerator generator = Generators.timeBasedGenerator();

    private final UUID uuid;

    public MsSqlOrderedUuidBuilder(UUID uuid) {

        if(uuid.version() != 1 && uuid.version() != 14) {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException(String.format("UUID is not a version 1 UUID (version is %d)", uuid.version()));
        }
        this.uuid = uuid;
    }

    public MsSqlOrderedUuidBuilder() {
        this(generator.generate());
    }

    private long getMostSignificantBits() {

        ByteBuffer buffer = ByteBuffer.wrap(new byte[8]);

        buffer.putLong(uuid.getMostSignificantBits());
        buffer.rewind();

        byte[] timeLow = new byte[4];
        buffer.get(timeLow);

        byte[] timeMid = new byte[2];
        buffer.get(timeMid);

        byte[] timeHigh = new byte[2]; // time_high and version
        buffer.get(timeHigh);

        buffer.clear();

        buffer.order(buffer.order().equals(ByteOrder.LITTLE_ENDIAN) ? ByteOrder.BIG_ENDIAN : ByteOrder.LITTLE_ENDIAN);

        buffer.put(timeHigh);
        buffer.put(timeMid);
        buffer.put(timeLow);

        return buffer.getLong(0);
    }

    private long getLeastSignificantBits() {
        return uuid.getLeastSignificantBits();
    }

    public UUID build() {
        return new UUID(getMostSignificantBits(), getLeastSignificantBits());
    }
}

If I attempt to use this class to store the resulting UUIDs in a different database (I am also have to write to MySQL) is doesnt end up being ordered and I am back to my original problem.

My solution was to create my own reversible custom UUID that when serialized into a byte array is sequentially ordered:

/**
 * <p>
 * Creates a custom UUID type with sequential bytes. The builder must be seeded with a version 1 uuid and the
 * algorithm is reversible.
 * </p>
 * @author Michael Lambert
 *
 */
public static class SequentialUuidBuilder {

    private static final TimeBasedGenerator generator = Generators.timeBasedGenerator();

    private final UUID uuid;

    public SequentialUuidBuilder(UUID uuid) {

        if(uuid.version() != 1 && uuid.version() != 13) {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException(String.format("UUID is not a version 1 UUID (version is %d)", uuid.version()));
        }
        this.uuid = uuid;
    }

    public SequentialUuidBuilder() {
        this(generator.generate());
    }

    private long getVersion13MostSignificantBits() {

        if(uuid.version() == 1) {

            // System.out.println(String.format("original: %x", version1.getMostSignificantBits()));
            //
            // System.out.println(String.format("lowa %x", timeLowA));
            //
            // 0xAAAAA00000000000L
            // 0x0000000AAAAA0000L
            //
            long timeLowPartA = (uuid.getMostSignificantBits() & 0xFFFFF00000000000L) >>> 28;
            //
            // 0x00000BBB00000000L
            // 0x0000000000000BBBL
            //
            long timeLowPartB = (uuid.getMostSignificantBits() & 0x00000FFF00000000L) >>> 32;
            //
            // System.out.println(String.format("lowb %x", timeLowB));
            //
            // 0x00000000MMMM0000L
            // 0x000MMMM000000000L
            //
            long timeMid = (uuid.getMostSignificantBits() &  0x00000000FFFF0000L) << 20;
            //
            // System.out.println(String.format("med %x", (timeMid)));
            //
            // 0x0000000000000HHHL
            // 0xHHH0000000000000L
            //
            long timeHigh = (uuid.getMostSignificantBits() & 0x0000000000000FFFL) << 52;
            //
            // System.out.println(String.format("high %x", timeHigh));
            //
            // 0x000000000000V000L
            // 0x000000000000V000L
            //
            // long version = (version1.getMostSignificantBits() &  0x000000000000F000L);
            //
            // System.out.println(String.format("version %x", version));
            //
            // 0x0000000AAAAA0000L
            // 0x0000000000000BBBL
            // 0x000MMMM000000000L
            // 0xHHH0000000000000L
            // 0x000000000000V000L <-- we don't change where the version is stored because we want to respect that part of the spec
            // ____________________
            // 0xHHHMMMMAAAAAVBBBL
            //
            long ordered = timeLowPartA | timeLowPartB | timeMid | timeHigh | 0x000000000000D000L; // custom version

            return ordered;
        }
        return 0;
    }

    public long getVersion1MostSignificantBits() {
        //
        // 0xHHHMMMMAAAAAVBBBL
        //
        long timeLowPartA = (uuid.getMostSignificantBits() & 0x0000000FFFFF0000L) << 28;
        long timeLowPartB = (uuid.getMostSignificantBits() & 0x0000000000000FFFL) << 32;
        long timeMid = (uuid.getMostSignificantBits() &  0x000FFFF000000000L) >> 20;
        long timeHigh = (uuid.getMostSignificantBits() & 0xFFF0000000000000L) >> 52;
        //
        // 0xAAAAA00000000000L
        // 0x00000000MMMM0000L
        // 0x00000BBB00000000L
        // 0x0000000000000HHHL
        // 0x000000000000V000L
        // ___________________
        // 0xAAAAABBBMMMMVHHHL
        //
        long bits = timeLowPartA | timeLowPartB | timeMid | timeHigh | 0x0000000000001000L; // reinstate version

        return bits;
    }

    private long getMostSignificantBits() {
        return (uuid.version() == 13) ? getVersion1MostSignificantBits() : getVersion13MostSignificantBits();
    }

    private long getLeastSignificantBits() {
        return uuid.getLeastSignificantBits();
    }

    public UUID build() {
        return new UUID(uuid.version() == 13 ? getVersion1MostSignificantBits() : getMostSignificantBits(), getLeastSignificantBits());
    }
}

MY QUESTION IS: is this an acceptable practice? Can I use BINARY(16) to store a primary key and is it okay to use a custom identifier in this way?

Thank you all in advance. Vive la Stackoverflow!

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1 Answer

Use a sequence generator unless you truly need your keys to be universally unique.

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They need to be unique across a distributed cluster of database servers. I have also researched the possibility of using a compound key with a sequential id and date as elements but using a UUID seems like a more obvious choice (given that its sole purpose is to uniquely identify an entity without regard to distribution). –  MacFlecknoe Feb 25 '12 at 4:37
    
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