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Is there any attribute that I can use, attached to the method definition, that will suppress any exceptions of a certain type originating in that method? e.g.

[SuppressException(typeof(TimeoutException))]
public void TroubleMethod()
{

}

So when there is a TimeoutException, it won't throw outside of TroubleMethod?

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1  
a bad idea, indeed. something is not right with the design if you want to suppress exceptions (without passing them over or handling them) – Andrei G Feb 24 '12 at 23:43
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use exception handling around the entire method:

public void TroubleMethod()
{
    try {
        // ...
    } catch(TimeoutException) {
        // Throw away
    }
}

I don't think an attribute that does what you describe exists, though. If you want the debugger to step through your method, you can always use [System.Diagnostics.DebuggerStepThrough()], but as for suppressing exceptions, I don't think that's possible.

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Downvote reason please? – Ryan O'Hara Aug 10 '12 at 15:21

You can use PostSharp to do some tricky instrumentation to add such attribute.

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If you really want to do this, you can get a bit closer to your attribute-like syntax with:

static void SuppressException<TException>(Action a) where TException : Exception
{
    try
    {
        a();
    }
    catch (TException) { }
}

 public void TroubleMethod()
 {
     SuppressException<TimeoutException>(() => {
     ...
     }
 }
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Not that I am aware of, but you can always do this:

public void TroubleMethod()
{
    try
    {
        // silly code goes here
    }
    catch() { }
}

A bad idea in almost all circumstances, though sometimes acceptable (rare). Just make sure to leave a comment for future maintainers (this includes you).

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you could use try-catch to catch the exeptions and just ignore it or better you could respond to that exeption check out the reference

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