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I'm trying to construct a GeoPoint from 2 Decimal. The issue I am facing is the GeoPoint constructor expects 2 ints in E6 format. So with literals it is easy:

GeoPoint point = new GeoPoint((int)61.54367E6, (int)-149.768E6);

But if my inputs are stored as Decimal what do I do?

Decimal Latitude = 61.54367;
Decimal Longitude = -149.768;
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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted
GeoPoint point = new GeoPoint((int)(Latitude * 1E6), (int)(Longitude * 1E6));
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perfect. Thank you much. –  Dan-o Feb 25 '12 at 0:21
    
You are welcome :) –  Mohammed Shraim Feb 25 '12 at 0:24

The "E6" format you're talking about is scientific notation. It's how floating point literals are written. See §9.4.4.2 (Integer Literals) and §9.4.4.3 (Real Literals) of the C# Standard: ISO/IEC 23270 (Information technology — Programming languages — C#). ISO/IEC 23270 and its brother, ISO/IEC 23271, describing the CLR, are freely available as PDF files from the ISO at

http://standards.iso.org/ittf/PubliclyAvailableStandards/index.html

But all you have to do is cast your decimal values to double

new GeoPoint( (double) latitude , (double) longitude ) ;

Or, alternatively, use the static Decimal.ToDouble() method:

new GeoPoint( Decimal.ToDouble(latitude) , Decimal.ToDouble(longitude) ) ;

Makes no difference which you do. The same thing happens under the covers.

You should note, though, that you may lose precision in the conversion to double. decimal trades range (magnitude) for precision; double and float trade precision for range (magnitude). Also, the conversion from double to decimal will throw an OverflowException if the value being converted cannot be represented as a decimal.

Any of the following values will throw an OverflowException:

  • Double.NaN
  • Double.PositiveInfinity
  • Double.NegativeInfinity
  • values less than Decimal.MinValue
  • values greater than Decimal.MaxValue
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Thank you for the additional information Nicholas –  Dan-o Feb 25 '12 at 1:21

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