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Can you print anything in C++, before entering into the main function?

It is interview question in Bloomberg:

Answer :create a global variable assigning value from printf statement with some content.

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2  
You should also ask them to show you a) their code style guides, and b) a representable piece of code from their codebase. –  Kerrek SB Feb 25 '12 at 0:13
3  
@KerrekSB: as in any big organization (there are > 3000 developers at Bloomberg), the quality of code varies from bad to good. The question about executing code prior to entering main() isn't entirely irrelevant and a reasonable intro e.g. to a discussion on how make sure accessed objects are constructed. Does it matter day to day? Probably not. ... and I would be suspicious about the answer quoted above: both global variables and the use of printf() would make me wonder. –  Dietmar Kühl Feb 25 '12 at 0:25

4 Answers 4

#include <iostream>
struct X
{
   X() 
   {
       std::cout << "Hello before ";
   }
} x;

int main()
{
   std::cout << "main()";
}

This well-formed C++ program prints

Hello before main()

You see, the C++ standard guarantees that the constructors of namespace-scope variables (in this example, it's x) will be executed before main(). Therefore, if you print something in a constructor of such an object, it will be printed before main(). QED

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very nice ......... –  user1065734 Feb 25 '12 at 0:20
3  
Answer is missing a piece: How can you be sure std::cout is safe to use at this point? –  Flexo Feb 25 '12 at 0:30
2  
27.4.1/2 in the n3242 draft, I don't have c++03 or n3290 available: The objects are constructed and the associations are established at some time prior to or during the first time an object of class ios_base::Init is constructed, and in any case before the body of main begins execution. The objects aren't destroyed during program execution. The results of including<iostream> in a translation unit shall be as if <iostream> defined an instance of ios_base::Init with static storage duration. [...] –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Feb 25 '12 at 1:13
3  
@wilhelmtell I think you misunderstood that quote, it means that the standard guarantees that cout will be constructed before x. The order of construction of objects of static duration in a single translation unit is guaranteed to be top to bottom, and that means that the ios_base::Init object will be i constructed before x –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Feb 25 '12 at 2:37
2  
@wilhelmtell I mean in the code in the answer, and yes, only if x is defined after iostream is included, which is the case here, and also in Kerrek's answer. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Feb 25 '12 at 2:59
#include <iostream>

std::ostream & o = (std::cout << "Hello\n");

int main()
{
   o << "Now main() runs.\n";
}
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Good one!!!!!!! –  Luchian Grigore Feb 25 '12 at 0:25
1  
Of course, you don't want o to be globally visible: namespace { std::ostream& o(std::cout << "hello\n"); } or static std::ostream& o(std::cout << "hello\n"); but these are details. –  Dietmar Kühl Feb 25 '12 at 0:31
    
if operator<<() throws you have a problem. –  wilhelmtell Feb 25 '12 at 0:43
1  
@wilhelmtell: You're basically saying that "if I/O fails and you are required to perform I/O before main(), then you have a problem." I agree. –  Kerrek SB Feb 25 '12 at 0:44
    
@wilhelmtell also note that by default iostreams don't throw. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Feb 25 '12 at 3:03

Header file

class A
{
   static A* a;
public:
   A() { cout << "A" ; }
};

Implementation file:

A* A::a = new A;

Well, statics (and not only) are initialized before the call to main.

EDIT

Another one:

bool b = /*(bool)*/printf("before main");

int main()
{
   return 0;
}
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3  
new MY EYES MY EYES!!! –  wilhelmtell Feb 25 '12 at 0:20
    
@wilhelmtell what's wrong with that? A can't contain itself as a member, and I was to lazy to write another class to prove a point. –  Luchian Grigore Feb 25 '12 at 0:23
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int b() {
  cout << "before ";
  return 0;
}
static int a = b();

int main() {
  cout << "main\n";
}
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