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Which of the following is correct (or does it matter).

Connection conn = null;
conn = DriverManager.getConnection (url, userName, password);
Statement st = conn.createStatement();
while (a.b()) {

  st.executeUpdate(blah blah); // same statement with different data values

}
st.close();
conn.close();





 finally
          {
              if (conn != null)
              {
                  try
                  {
                      conn.close ();
                  }
                  catch (Exception e) {  }
              }
          }
      }

or

Connection conn = null;
conn = DriverManager.getConnection (url, userName, password);
while (a.b()) {
  Statement st = conn.createStatement();
  st.executeUpdate(blah blah); //same statement with different data values
  st.close();
}
conn.close();




  finally
          {
              if (conn != null)
              {
                  try
                  {
                      conn.close ();

                  }
                  catch (Exception e) {  }
              }
          }
      }
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As an aside, you probably want to close the connection, at least, in a finally block... –  DNA Feb 25 '12 at 0:57
    
Ya I already do that.. I'm updating my code with it.. –  Ank Feb 25 '12 at 0:58

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Creating the statement outside the loop is cleaner, and may be somewhat faster, though you'd need to profile in order to see if it makes much difference in your case.

If the loop is doing the same thing with different data values, I would prefer PreparedStatement for speed.

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yes the loop is doing the same thing with different data values.. I'll read about PreparedStatement –  Ank Feb 25 '12 at 0:55
    
Is there an advantage of PreparedStatement to the second case i mentioned other than performance? –  Ank Feb 25 '12 at 1:02
1  
@Ankur The second case negates the advantages of prepared statement, because it would prepare it over and over again. The idea is to prepare it once, and then reuse it in a loop as many times as needed. –  dasblinkenlight Feb 25 '12 at 1:08

If the update inside the loop reuses the exact same statement, then the first form is preferred. On the contrary, if the statement changes with each iteration, then you're stuck with the second form.

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2  
Agreed - caching a prepared statement would help immensely. Although depending on the exact nature of things, the statement may be re-writeable to a single mass update. –  Clockwork-Muse Feb 25 '12 at 0:53

Really, you should be using PreparedStatement with placeholders and only creating the statement once as in your first example.

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Is there an advantage of PreparedStatement to the second case i mentioned other than performance? –  Ank Feb 25 '12 at 1:02
1  
There is no valid reason I can think of to create and throw away Statement objects as you're doing in your second example. You're going to be allocating memory you don't need to be allocating, and the GC is going to have to deal with it. –  Brian Roach Feb 25 '12 at 1:14

I don't think there's a big difference in the above case - you would like to close the statement if there's enough work in between for it to stay open for a long time - as per the docs:

Releases this Statement object's database and JDBC resources immediately instead of waiting for this to happen when it is automatically closed. It is generally good practice to release resources as soon as you are finished with them to avoid tying up database resources.

Unless your SQL changes, the best is to use PreparedStatement instead, using the first way you specified.

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Is there an advantage of PreparedStatement to the second case i mentioned other than performance? –  Ank Feb 25 '12 at 1:02
1  
You would not want to use the second way you mentioned with PreparedStatement. The idea with PreparedStatements is to reuse them as much as possible, creating them more times just reduces the benefits. There should be no other benefit except the performance and that only in cases where you have multiple invocations. –  icyrock.com Feb 25 '12 at 1:05
    
no I meant using the way I described in the second case with CreateStatement or using the first case with PreparedStatement. Is there an advantage with PreparedStatement other than performance.. –  Ank Feb 25 '12 at 1:06
    
Performance and parameters. Parameters allow you to run the same SQL multiple times with different parameters without the need to a) build the SQL yourself (e.g. concatenating strings) and b) add some degree of safety (automatic escaping - e.g. avoids SQL injection, auto value transformation - e.g. Dates are represented in the final SQL as needed, etc.). –  icyrock.com Feb 25 '12 at 1:11
1  
There'd be a big difference if you looped 20k times, creating and throwing away 20k objects to the GC. There's literally no reason to do that. –  Brian Roach Feb 25 '12 at 1:17

Neither is correct. Assuming that you are not repeatedly executing the exact same query, but that they have different values, then you should be using a (single) PreparedStatement with a query that has placeholders and supplying the different values at each loop iteration.

Using a prepared statement will be more efficient on the Java side (by reducing object creation and GC costs). It could also reduce the load on the database side depending on how the JDBC drivers work.

The other point is that you need to close the PreparedStatement and the Connection in the finally clause of a try. If you don't and an exception is thrown, then your code will leak a database connection. This could cause problems later on.

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