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For Django 1.3.1, where is the source code that makes it possible to do a from django.conf.urls import patterns ?

In the Django 1.3.1 source code for the django.conf.urls package, __init__.py is empty, so there is no code or __all__ variable. The code for the patterns() function appears to be in defaults.py which does have an __all__ variable.

How does Python end up including a pattern() function in the django.conf.urls package?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I figured out my problem:

  1. I discovered I was wrong about thinking I was successfully running
    from django.conf.urls import pattern
    in Django 1.3.1. The code was actually
    from django.conf.urls.defaults import pattern

  2. There are two different Django tutorials:

  3. I opened Django ticket 17770 for this, and it was closed as a duplicate of ticket 16932. Ticket 16933 was opened and fixed to remedy the confusion of the different versions of documentation/tutorials. However, it wasn't apparent to me. I added a screenshot to 16933 showing how to see which version of the docs you are reading (and to select a different version). enter image description here

  4. I was confused because I thought I was using
    from django.conf.urls import...
    as the tutorial states, and I thought that code was working. But in fact I was using the urls.py code that gets created with django-admin.py startproject, and this code is correctly using
    from django.conf.urls.defaults import...
    for Django 1.3.1. That worked.

  5. My confusion surfaced in tutorial 4, when I copied the polls/urls.py code from the tutorial for the dev version. That code is from django.conf.urls import... and it causes:

    Django Version: 1.3.1
    Exception Type: ImportError
    Exception Value: cannot import name patterns
    Exception Location: /.../django_tutorial_1/polls/urls.py in , line 1

jdi, thanks for your help. Although your answer wasn't exactly what I was looking for, it encouraged me to keep going. My question stated a false fact, which I later discovered (per #1 above).

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Its in the defaults module inside of the urls package.

>>> from django.conf.urls.defaults import *
>>> patterns
<function patterns at 0x102444410>

https://code.djangoproject.com/browser/django/tags/releases/1.3.1/django/conf/urls/defaults.py

I realize that in the django docs they make a reference like this: https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/topics/http/urls/#example

from django.conf.urls import patterns, url, include

But (at least for me) it produces an error. It may have been included at that location at one point but the current source does not show it there any more. Every 1.3 project I have imports patterns() from the defaults module.

Update

The django dev branch docs refer to patterns as being under the urls package. But the stable 1.3 docs refer to it being under defaults.

https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/topics/http/urls/#how-django-processes-a-request

https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/1.3/topics/http/urls/#how-django-processes-a-request

So I would say the stable way to access it is via default module. You were most likely at one point using the dev branch of django, because creating a new project with the stable 1.3 even defines its default urls.py with the defaults location

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Yes, I see that patterns() can be imported via the django.conf.urls.defaults module. But my question is how it's able to be imported from the django.conf.urls package. I have 9 projects where I'm able to import it from django.conf.urls module. Now I created a new project, following the Django tutorial, and I'm getting an "ImportError - cannot import name patterns". I'm using the same virtualenv with the same Python and Django. If I change it to django.conf.urls.defaults it does work, but I want to understand how django.conf.urls.patterns() works sometimes. –  Rob Bednark Feb 25 '12 at 3:07

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