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So i have a java class, with 3 private fields

public class Parcel {
    private String guid;
    private List<String> files;
    private String zipFileName;

    public Parcel (List<String> files, String zipFilePath){
        UUID uuid = UUID.randomUUID();
        guid = uuid.toString();

        zipFileName = zipFilePath + File.separator + guid + File.separator + ".zip";

        if ((files != null) && (!files.isEmpty())){
            this.files = files;
        }
    }
}

Now, I am writing JUnit test to test these private fields

public class ParcelTest {

    @Test
    public void parcelObject() {
        String zipFilePath = "/path/to/folder";
        List<String> files = new ArrayList<String>();

        files.add("/path/to/folder/test1");
        files.add("/path/to/folder/test2");

        Parcel parcel = new Parcel(files, zipFilePath);

        Class<? extends Parcel> parcelClass = parcel.getClass();

        try {
                        Field guid = parcelClass.getDeclaredField("guid");
        guid.setAccessible(true);
        System.out.println(guid.get(parcel));
        } catch (IllegalArgumentException e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        } catch (SecurityException e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        } catch (IllegalAccessException e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        } catch (NoSuchFieldException e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

}

I am getting error when trying to access private guid field. I have tried this even after creating zero argument constructor. how should i access private members here?

EDIT I figured it out and i have updated my response if someone else needed it.

P.S: How can i close this question>

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2  
What you should do is create an Answer for your Question containing the material above, and then accept it. –  Stephen C Feb 25 '12 at 2:41

2 Answers 2

You are much better off testing the externally visible behaviour (behaviour, not getters and setters). If your code doesn't change behaviour, you should delete it.

(Also you might want to copy your list before stashing it in a field (and before checking validity).)

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Why don't you have a public getter or setter instead of dealing with reflection?

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1  
don't want to create it. Anyways, I figured it out. I will update the post .. thanks for help :) –  Em Ae Feb 25 '12 at 2:36
    
You could use public final fields, if you don't want to create getters. –  Stefan Birkner Feb 25 '12 at 10:29

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