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So, i'm trying to learn python and every time i post a question here it feels like giving in...

I'm trying to make my own class of turtle.Turtle.

    import turtle
class TurtleGTX(turtle.Turtle):
    """My own version of turtle"""
    def __init__(self):
        pass

my_turtle = TurtleGTX()
my_turtle.forward(10)

Gives the Traceback: AttributeError: 'TurtleGTX' object has no attribute '_position'. Which I then learn is a "private vairable" which according to the offical python tutorial i can mangle/override in my subclass TurtleGTX. How to do this with a program as large as turtle seems rather difficult and implies i'm missing a simpler solution to the problem. In the end i learned and that was the point but i would still like to run it by the community to see if there is a elegant way to create a subclass of turtle.Turtle. (The next step is to have your turtle behave different then the standard turtle)

So a comment below made me think that maybe i could do this:

import turtle
class TurtleGTX(turtle.Turtle):
    """My own version of turtle"""


my_turtle = TurtleGTX()
my_turtle.forward(100)

which actual runs! Now i'm going to see where that leads me... something tells me that i might have gone 1 step forward two step back as this means i won't be able to initialize anything on my subclass...

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Rounding up Ignacio's answer and orokusaki's comment you probably should write something like

import turtle
class TurtleGTX(turtle.Turtle):
    """My own version of turtle"""
    def __init__(self,*args,**kwargs):
        super(TurtleGTX,self).__init__(*args,**kwargs)
        print("Time for my GTX turtle!")

my_turtle = TurtleGTX()
my_turtle.forward(100)
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Thanks for the help, I might have mis-understood the question the tutorial was asking as they never introduced super, *args or **kwargs... –  DrewV Feb 25 '12 at 14:39
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If you redefine a method (such as __init__()) in a child class then it is your responsibility to call the parent's method in order to have the parent's behavior respected.

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Also note, your init needs to accept the same args, kwargs as the parent and you need to call the super() init with the args, kwargs, unless you intend to rewrite the interface. –  orokusaki Feb 25 '12 at 5:26
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