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I have written a simple code using getopt for understanding perspective.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{

 /* Here since c is followed with colon, so 'c' takes an argument */
  const char *optstring = "abc:d";

  int ret;

  while((ret=getopt(argc, argv, optstring))!= -1)
  {
    switch(ret)
    {
      case 'a':
        printf("Option found: a, optind = %d\n",optind);
        break;

      case 'b':
         printf("Option found: b, optind = %d\n",optind);
         break;

      case 'c':
         printf("Option found: c, optind = %d\n",optind);
         printf("Option argument: %s\n",optarg);
         break;

      case 'd':
         printf("Option found: d, optind = %d\n",optind);
         break;

      case ':':
         printf("The option takes an argument which is missing");
         break;

     //case '?':
       //   printf("Didn't you enter an invalid option?");
           // break;
     }
   }
 }

The problem is:

(1) Case 1: If the case '?' is commented then:

[root@dhcppc0 getopt]# ./a.out -a -b -c
    Option found: a, optind = 2
    Option found: b, optind = 3
    ./a.out: option requires an argument -- c

So, as you can see, the case ':' did not take into effect, as normally we expect a missing argument to return a ':' (colon) by getopt.

(2) Case 2: AND, if i un-comment it, and then run the program, it hits the case '? even for missing argument.

enter code here
[root@dhcppc0 getopt]# ./a.out -a -b -c
   Option found: a, optind = 2
   Option found: b, optind = 3
      ./a.out: option requires an argument -- c
      Didn't you enter an invalid option?

What is the point i am missing here?

ADDED LATER:

Also why is the ./a.out: option requires an argument -- c the default error coming? How to handle it, since i am already taking care for it in the case ':', and don't want the default error message?

ADDED AGAIN: As suggested in the answer, i used the colon in beginning of optstring - const char *optstring = ":abc:d", then why is this happening?

./a.out -a -b -c -d returns -d as the argument to c?? -d is a separate optional character and not any argument
share|improve this question
    
NB: You should use const char optstring[] = ...; -- saves the extra pointer indirection. –  jørgensen Feb 25 '12 at 9:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The POSIX version of the getopt() function specifies:

If getopt() encounters an option character that is not contained in optstring, it shall return the <question-mark> ( '?' ) character. If it detects a missing option-argument, it shall return the <colon> character ( ':' ) if the first character of optstring was a <colon>, or a <question-mark> character ( '?' ) otherwise.

Since your optstr does not start with a :, it should return a ? instead.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, can you please help me with this? I used the ":" then why, ./a.out -a -b -c -d returns -d as the argument to c?? -d is a separate optional character and not any argument –  kingsmasher1 Feb 25 '12 at 7:01
    
Because that is the way that the POSIX specification is interpreted. In practice, it means that only the last option on the command line can ever report the missing argument. (I have some code to parse options. The documentation for it notes: Under POSIX getopt(), you can specify a leading colon ':' in the options string, and that means that arguments are optional. However, in practice, only the last option specified on the command line can be omitted, because getopt() gobbles any argument starting with a dash as the argument. This is not helpful... and goes on to explain an alternative.) –  Jonathan Leffler Feb 25 '12 at 7:58
    
Thanks, that was helpful. –  kingsmasher1 Feb 28 '12 at 8:13

From man getopt:

If getopt() finds an option character in argv that was not included in optstring, or if it detects a missing option argument, it returns '?' and sets the external variable optopt to the actual option character.

So your program behavior is by design as expected. You may be confusing the expected return value of getopt with this statement in the man page:

If the first character (following any optional '+' or '-' described above) of optstring is a colon (':'), then getopt() returns ':' instead of '?' to indicate a missing option argument. If an error was detected, and the first character of optstring is not a colon, and the external variable opterr is nonzero (which is the default), getopt() prints an error message.

So try declaring your optstring as follows:

const char *optstring = ":abc:d";
share|improve this answer
    
I used the ":" then why, ./a.out -a -b -c -d returns -d as the argument to c?? -d is a separate optional character and not any argument –  kingsmasher1 Feb 25 '12 at 6:54
    
@kingsmasher1, no -c expects an argument and it takes anything that is given after -c is taken as argument to it. –  Jens Gustedt Feb 25 '12 at 7:46

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