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<link rel="EditURI" type="application/rsd+xml" title="RSD" href="http://www.blogger.com/rsd.g?blogID=7487871339000666216" />

How can I get the href attribute of this link tag without using any javascript library?

Right now I'm using the code below to achieve this but I want to know whether there is a simpler solution.

var links = document.getElementsByTagName("link");
for (i in links){
    var title = links[i].getAttribute("title");
    if ( title == "RSD"){
        var href = links[i].getAttribute("href");
        break;
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
That is more or less how to do it - except no need to do for-in since it is an array – mplungjan Feb 25 '12 at 6:44
1  
@mplungjan for-in iteration is not appropriate, and links' does *not* refer to an Array` instance. It refers to an object implementing the NodeList interface, maybe even the HTMLCollection interface in some host environments (browsers). However, it would not be appropriate with an Array instance as well (see my answer). – PointedEars Feb 25 '12 at 8:00
    
That is what I said. Do not use for-in here. For all intents and purposes the collection will behave like an array. I cannot change my comment to say array-like. – mplungjan Feb 25 '12 at 9:49
    
@mplungjan Your correct recommendation was/is based on faulty reasoning. 1. A NodeList will not behave like an Array instance (please don't simply say "array", that is the concept instead); it is a host object instead. For example, NodeLists are live, Array instances are not. NodeLists have methods that Array instances are lacking. 2. AISB, for-in is inappropriate with both object types. – PointedEars Feb 25 '12 at 22:47
    
In my opinion this is pure semantics... Thanks for the lecture though. I will try to be more correct in the future. – mplungjan Feb 26 '12 at 6:43
up vote 13 down vote accepted

Modern browsers support querySelector() and querySelectorAll():

document.querySelector("link[title=RSD]").getAttribute("href");

See browser support chart.

share|improve this answer
2  
Note that IE 7 and lower do not support this method. That said, I'd say "screw IE 7" and use querySelector anyway XD – Niet the Dark Absol Feb 25 '12 at 6:47
    
+1 I learned something new. – Shawn Taylor Feb 25 '12 at 6:50
    
@ShawnTaylor so where is your +1 ? – mplungjan Feb 25 '12 at 7:07
    
I tried querySelector before asking here but it did't work out...I must have done something stupid :( Thank you anyway! – WTFIsGoingOn Feb 25 '12 at 7:21
    
@mplungjan: oops.. I mistaken. – Shawn Taylor Feb 25 '12 at 7:42

Original code:

<link rel="EditURI" type="application/rsd+xml" title="RSD" href="http://www.blogger.com/rsd.g?blogID=7487871339000666216" />

var links = document.getElementsByTagName("link");
for (i in links){
  var title = links[i].getAttribute("title");
  if ( title == "RSD"){
    var href = links[i].getAttribute("href");
    break;
  }
}
  1. The markup above is a link element, not a "link tag".

  2. There is no "javascript", there are several different ECMAScript implementations. The term "javascript" is misleading and should not be used as an umbrella term for those programming languages.

    There cannot be "pure javascript" in a Web browser, which is a host environment. Even document refers to a host(-provided) object, which is not part of any core language (ECMAScript Language Specification, 5.1 Edition [ECMA-262-5.1], section 4).

  3. Always declare your identifiers (i is undeclared). Not declaring them, and thereby not attaching them to an execution context, has side-effects ranging from leaks into calling execution contexts to runtime errors. Therefore, such code does not run in ECMAScript Ed. 5.x strict mode, it throws a ReferenceError exception (ECMA-262-5.1, sections 12.6.4 and 8.7.2).

  4. Never use the for-in statement with array-like objects, in particular outside of testing not with host objects (links refers to one). Neither consideration of only numeric property names nor iteration order is guaranteed (ECMA-262-5.1, section 12.6.4).

  5. DRY: Avoid accessing the same property twice (you are accessing links[i] twice). Else the result would be a greater variant in the program (the object may have changed in the meantime), and the approach would be inefficient and harder to maintain, unnecessarily.

  6. Avoid calling the getAttribute() and setAttribute() methods of element objects in favor of accessing attribute properties that have getters and setters. The former are less backwards-compatible and known to be unreliable, in particular in MSHTML/IE where there is no proper distinction between attribute values and attribute property values.

    var links = document.getElementsByTagName("link");
    for (var i = 0, len = links && links.length; i < len; ++i)
    {
      var link = links[i];
      if (link.title == "RSD")
      {
        var href = link.href;
        break;
      }
    }
    
  7. Use the id attribute and the document.getElementById() method if you want to refer an element quickly (but also consider using host-provided collections):

    <link rel="EditURI" type="application/rsd+xml" title="RSD"
          href="http://www.blogger.com/rsd.g?blogID=7487871339000666216"
          id="mylink" />
    

    ...

    var link = document.getElementById("mylink");
    var href = link && link.href;
    
  8. Do not use XHTML (syntax) unless you have to (remove the trailing slash if it is still Valid, see the W3C Validator). With LINK elements in particular, which must be located within the HEAD element, it is a syntax error in HTML up to version 4.01 that has no standardized remedy. HTML5 specifies it but that is still a Working Draft, and not yet fully implemented in user agents.

  9. People who satisfy themselves with saying only "screw $browser" have not had sufficient professional experience (see for example The Internet Explorer 6 Countdown, by Microsoft, which is still showing a large number [currently 25.1%] of IE 6 users in emerging markets). You would be well-advised to ignore the former group on this topic.

share|improve this answer
    
+1: adding details about the reasoning behind your suggestion would really help. – Shawn Taylor Feb 25 '12 at 7:40
    
@ShawnTaylor [x] done. Please ask if anything is still unclear. – PointedEars Feb 25 '12 at 8:58
    
+1 for detailed answer. "People who are satisfied with saying only "screw $browser" have not had sufficient professional experience" – I must disagree; when $browser is ~decade old, that's perfectly acceptable in most cases. – jholster Feb 25 '12 at 9:08
2  
@jholster There is a difference between saying "I do not care" and "I do care, but not much". It is possible to emulate those features that are not yet supported, and degrade gracefully, with wrapper methods, achieving maximum compatibility with little effort. Any well-written script library should include such a compatibility layer, being optional if possible. – PointedEars Feb 25 '12 at 9:13
    
@PointedEars, no argument here. – jholster Feb 25 '12 at 9:33

Yes, by giving an ID tag. http://jsfiddle.net/Lc7ut/

share|improve this answer

You could use JQuery:

var url = $('link[rel=canonical]').attr("href");
share|improve this answer
    
Please look a title javascript pure is not jquery ;-) – KingRider Mar 17 at 15:04

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