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I'm implementing a faceted search functionality where the user can filter and drill down on 4 properties of my model: City, Type, Purpose and Value.

I have a view section with the facets like this:

enter image description here

Each line displayed in the above image is clickable so that the user can drill down and do the filtering...

The way I'm doing it is with query strings that I pass using a custom ActionLink helper method:

 @Html.ActionLinkWithQueryString(linkText, "Filter",
                                 new { facet2 = Model.Types.Key, value2 = fv.Range });

This custom helper keeps the previous filters (query string parameters) and merges them with new route values present in other action links. I get a result like this when the user has applied 3 filters:

http://leniel-pc:8083/realty/filter?facet1=City&value1=Volta%20Redonda&
facet2=Type&value2=6&facet3=Purpose&value3=3

It's working but I'd like to know about a better/cleaner way of doing this using routes. The order of the parameters can change depending on the filters the user has applied. I have something like this in mind:

http://leniel-pc:8083/realty/filter // returns ALL rows

http://leniel-pc:8083/realty/filter/city/rio-de-janeiro/type/6/value/50000-100000

http://leniel-pc:8083/realty/filter/city/volta-redonda/type/6/purpose/3

http://leniel-pc:8083/realty/filter/type/7/purpose/1

http://leniel-pc:8083/realty/filter/purpose/3/type/4

http://leniel-pc:8083/realty/filter/type/8/city/carangola

Is this possible? Any ideas?

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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Is this possible? Any ideas?

I would keep the query string parameters for filtering.

But if you wanted to achieve the urls you have asked for in your question I will cover 2 possible techniques.

For both approaches that I will present here I assume that you already have a view model:

public class FilterViewModel
{
    public string Key { get; set; }
    public string Value { get; set; }
}

and a controller:

public class RealtyController : Controller
{
    public ActionResult Filter(IEnumerable<FilterViewModel> filters)
    {
        ... do the filtering ...
    }
}

The first option is to write a custom model binder that will be associated with the IEnumerable<FilterViewModel> type:

public class FilterViewModelBinder : IModelBinder
{
    public object BindModel(ControllerContext controllerContext, ModelBindingContext bindingContext)
    {
        var filtersValue = bindingContext.ValueProvider.GetValue("pathInfo");
        if (filtersValue == null || string.IsNullOrEmpty(filtersValue.AttemptedValue))
        {
            return Enumerable.Empty<FilterViewModel>();
        }

        var filters = filtersValue.AttemptedValue;
        var tokens = filters.Split('/');
        if (tokens.Length % 2 != 0)
        {
            throw new Exception("Invalid filter format");
        }

        var result = new List<FilterViewModel>();
        for (int i = 0; i < tokens.Length - 1; i += 2)
        {
            var key = tokens[i];
            var value = tokens[i + 1];
            result.Add(new FilterViewModel
            {
                Key = tokens[i],
                Value = tokens[i + 1]
            });
        }

        return result;
    }
}

which will be registered in Application_Start:

ModelBinders.Binders.Add(typeof(IEnumerable<FilterViewModel>), new FilterViewModelBinder());

and you will also have a filter route:

public static void RegisterRoutes(RouteCollection routes)
{
    routes.IgnoreRoute("{resource}.axd/{*pathInfo}");

    routes.MapRoute(
        "Filter",
        "realty/filter/{*pathInfo}",
        new { controller = "Realty", action = "Filter" }
    );

    routes.MapRoute(
        "Default",
        "{controller}/{action}/{id}",
        new { controller = "Home", action = "Index", id = UrlParameter.Optional }
    );
}

A second possibility is to write a custom route

public class FilterRoute : Route
{
    public FilterRoute()
        : base(
            "realty/filter/{*pathInfo}", 
            new RouteValueDictionary(new 
            { 
                controller = "realty", action = "filter" 
            }), 
            new MvcRouteHandler()
        )
    {
    }

    public override RouteData GetRouteData(HttpContextBase httpContext)
    {
        var rd = base.GetRouteData(httpContext);
        if (rd == null)
        {
            return null;
        }

        var filters = rd.Values["pathInfo"] as string;
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(filters))
        {
            return rd;
        }

        var tokens = filters.Split('/');
        if (tokens.Length % 2 != 0)
        {
            throw new Exception("Invalid filter format");
        }

        var index = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < tokens.Length - 1; i += 2)
        {
            var key = tokens[i];
            var value = tokens[i + 1];
            rd.Values[string.Format("filters[{0}].key", index)] = key;
            rd.Values[string.Format("filters[{0}].value", index)] = value;
            index++;
        }

        return rd;
    }
}

which will be registered in your RegisterRoutes method:

public static void RegisterRoutes(RouteCollection routes)
{
    routes.IgnoreRoute("{resource}.axd/{*pathInfo}");

    routes.Add("Filter", new FilterRoute());

    routes.MapRoute(
        "Default",
        "{controller}/{action}/{id}",
        new { controller = "Home", action = "Index", id = UrlParameter.Optional }
    );
}
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WOW! Fantastic my friend... always outstanding answers. I think that for now I'll keep the QueryString approach since it's working as expected using the QueryString manipulation I mention in the question. Your answer I'm sure will be used in the future. Great reference for us simple mortals... –  Leniel Macaferi Feb 26 '12 at 15:29
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In my opinion (and this is pretty subjective) your initial approach seems fine. I think search criteria belong on the querystring as they represent a subset of the resources you're trying to retrieve.

Your urls don't make much sense from a logical resource hierarchy point of view.

I would probably rename the "filter" method "search" however, with the filters being the querystring variables. Also, is it necessary to define facets in the querystring - can't you achieve the same result by naming the facet explicity, like ?city=Volta&type=6&purpose=3 ?

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Yes Mike. I was so concentrated on this that I completely forgot that I could simply pass simple parameters. No need to facet1/value1, etc... I already refactored that. Thanks for adding your answer. It helps a lot to have another point of view. –  Leniel Macaferi Feb 25 '12 at 17:27
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